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Award Abstract #0737667

Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration

NSF Org: DRL
Division Of Research On Learning
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Initial Amendment Date: August 27, 2007
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Latest Amendment Date: June 1, 2009
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Award Number: 0737667
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Award Instrument: Continuing grant
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Program Manager: Julia Clark
DRL Division Of Research On Learning
EHR Direct For Education and Human Resources
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Start Date: September 1, 2007
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End Date: August 31, 2011 (Estimated)
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Awarded Amount to Date: $758,425.00
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Investigator(s): Kevin Clark kclark6@gmu.edu (Principal Investigator)
Kimberly Sheridan (Co-Principal Investigator)
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Sponsor: George Mason University
4400 UNIVERSITY DR
FAIRFAX, VA 22030-4422 (703)993-2295
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NSF Program(s): ITEST
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Program Reference Code(s): 9177, SMET
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Program Element Code(s): 7227

ABSTRACT

A Youth-Based project is proposed by George Mason University in which the primary goal is to increase motivation, achievement, and exposure to STEM content of students from urban public schools by having them work with scientists and experts to design and build educational games that can be utilized by other students and teachers. The project is a partnership between George Mason University and McKinley Technology High School in Washington, DC. It will include 100 high school students from McKinley and other high schools and 100 middle school students from urban schools. During the academic year the project proposes a 3-week gaming camp which meets four hours each day while the academic year activities include 24weeks of activities for three hours each week. The project introduces fundamental concepts of IT as students develop human animation, multimedia authoring and rapid game prototyping using 3D tools. The project will include hands-on, inquiry-based activities with a strong emphasis on non-traditional approaches to learning and the intensive use of information technologies such as: web-based programming, GIS, architecture, database management, motion capture, LAN network management. The project targets urban traditionally underrepresented students from the Washington, DC area with the vision of being a model for other distance learning efforts.


PUBLICATIONS PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF THIS RESEARCH

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Clark, K. and Sheridan, K.. "Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration," Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, v.9, 2010, p. 125.

BOOKS/ONE TIME PROCEEDING

Sheridan, K., Clark, K. & Peters, E.. "How scientific inquiry emerges from
game design", 09/01/2009-08/31/2010, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2009, "pp. 1555-1563. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

Scott, K., Clark, K., Sheridan, K.,
Mruczek, C., and Hayes, E.. "Culturally Relevant Computing Programs:
Two Examples to Inform Teacher
Professional Development", 09/01/2009-08/31/2010, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2010, "pp. 1269-1277. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

Scott, K., Clark, K., Sheridan, K., Hayes,
E., and Mruczek, C.. "Engaging More Students from
Underrepresented Groups In Technology:
What Happens if We Don't?", 09/01/2009-08/31/2010, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2010, "pp. 4097-4104. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

Sheridan, K., Clark, K. & Peters, E.. "How scientific inquiry emerges from
game design", 09/01/2010-08/31/2011, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2009, "pp. 1555-1563. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

Scott, K., Clark, K., Sheridan, K.,
Mruczek, C., and Hayes, E.. "Culturally Relevant Computing Programs:
Two Examples to Inform Teacher
Professional Development", 09/01/2010-08/31/2011, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2010, "pp. 1269-1277. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

Scott, K., Clark, K., Sheridan, K., Hayes,
E., and Mruczek, C.. "Engaging More Students from
Underrepresented Groups In Technology:
What Happens if We Don't?", 09/01/2010-08/31/2011, "Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology and Teacher Education
International Conference"
,  2010, "pp. 4097-4104. Chesapeake, VA: AACE".

 

Please report errors in award information by writing to: awardsearch@nsf.gov.

 

 

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