text-only page produced automatically by Usablenet Assistive Skip all navigation and go to page content Skip top navigation and go to directorate navigation Skip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
Awards
design element
Search Awards
Recent Awards
Presidential and Honorary Awards
About Awards
Grant Policy Manual
Grant General Conditions
Cooperative Agreement Conditions
Special Conditions
Federal Demonstration Partnership
Policy Office Website



Award Abstract #1138673

RAPID: Investigation on the Performance of Buildings with Structural Walls in the Tohoku, Japan, Earthquake of 2011

NSF Org: CMMI
Div Of Civil, Mechanical, & Manufact Inn
divider line
Initial Amendment Date: August 1, 2011
divider line
Latest Amendment Date: August 1, 2011
divider line
Award Number: 1138673
divider line
Award Instrument: Standard Grant
divider line
Program Manager: Kishor Mehta
CMMI Div Of Civil, Mechanical, & Manufact Inn
ENG Directorate For Engineering
divider line
Start Date: August 15, 2011
divider line
End Date: July 31, 2013 (Estimated)
divider line
Awarded Amount to Date: $49,000.00
divider line
Investigator(s): Santiago Pujol spujol@purdue.edu (Principal Investigator)
Mete Sozen (Co-Principal Investigator)
divider line
Sponsor: Purdue University
Young Hall
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2114 (765)494-1055
divider line
NSF Program(s): Structural and Architectural E,
COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH
divider line
Program Reference Code(s): 036E, 039E, 040E, 1576, 1637, 5921, 5978, 7298, 7914, 8016, 9102
divider line
Program Element Code(s): 1637, 7298

ABSTRACT

The objective of this Rapid Research Response (RAPID) award is to investigate the performance of buildings with structural walls in the Tohoku, Japan, earthquake of 2011. The goals of this investigation are (1) to collect quantitative data on the seismic performance of buildings with dominant structural walls in the Tohoku region, (2) to compare it with similar information obtained in Chile, (3) to identify the causes of successes and failures observed in the two locations, (4) to test the ability of state-of-the-art simulation tools to reproduce what occurred in the field, and (5) to summarize the findings in brief statements and/or algorithms that can be used to design safer structures. Building standards in Chile, Japan, and the US are comparable. Nevertheless, the Maule, Chile, Earthquake of 2010 caused severe structural failures that demonstrated that there are critical missing links in our technology related to earthquake resistance of mid- to high-rise buildings with structural reinforced concrete walls. In Concepción, Chile, where the peak ground acceleration did not exceed 0.4g, nearly 7 percent of the buildings with more than 10 stories were evacuated and scheduled for demolition. In contrast, the intensity of the ground motion caused by the earthquake of 2011 in the Japanese region of Tohoku was as large or larger than in Concepción (with peak ground accelerations exceeding 2g), but the frequency of building damage was lower.

The knowledge to be generated by this investigation will contribute to the safety of urban populations in seismic regions. The investigation will lead to elimination of massive economic and human losses in future earthquakes. In addition, the necessary fieldwork will involve the participation of students in a rich educational and cultural activity. The findings of the investigation will be made available to the public through NEEShub.org, an easily and universally accessible NSF-funded web site dedicated to improving engineering knowhow.

 

Please report errors in award information by writing to: awardsearch@nsf.gov.

 

 

Print this page
Back to Top of page
  FUNDING   AWARDS   DISCOVERIES   NEWS   PUBLICATIONS   STATISTICS   ABOUT NSF   FASTLANE  
Research.gov  |  USA.gov  |  National Science Board  |  Recovery Act  |  Budget and Performance  |  Annual Financial Report
Web Policies and Important Links  |  Privacy  |  FOIA  |  NO FEAR Act  |  Inspector General  |  Webmaster Contact  |  Site Map
National Science Foundation Logo
The National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, Virginia 22230, USA
Tel: (703) 292-5111, FIRS: (800) 877-8339 | TDD: (800) 281-8749
  Text Only Version