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Policy Office


Cybersecurity Doctrine: Towards Public Cybersecurity

Fred Schneider Photo

Fred B. Schneider
Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science
Cornell University


THURSDAY June 2, Noon, Room 110

NSF regrets that due to an audio malfunction, the recording of this talk is not available. However, the speaker has provided a link to the paper on which the talk was based.
Deirdre K. Mulligan and Fred B. Schneider, "Doctrine for Cybersecurity."


Abstract:

With increasing dependence on networked computing systems comes increasing vulnerability. The vulnerabilities are mostly technical in origin, but their remediation is not. Only by coupling technical insights with public policy do we stand a good chance to create a safer and more secure cyberspace. This talk will survey the landscape, discuss why past doctrines have failed, and propose a new doctrine of Public Cybersecurity. (Joint work with Deirdre Mulligan)

Speaker:

Fred B. Schneider is the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell, where he has been on the faculty since 1978. He also serves as Chief Scientist for the NSF "TRUST" Science and Technology Center.Schneider's research concerns trustworthy systems, most recently focusing on computer security. He was the editor of "Trust in Cyberspace" which reports findings from the US National Research Council's study committee on information systems trustworthiness that Schneider chaired. A fellow of the AAAS, ACM, and IEEE, Schneider was awarded a D.Sc. [honoris causa] by the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 2003. His survey paper on state machine replication received a SIGOPS Hall of Fame Award in 2007. And he has been elected to membership of the US National Academy of Engineering and to its Norwegian counterpart (NTV)

 

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