text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation Home National Science Foundation - Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE)
Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE)
design element
SBE Home
About SBE
Funding Opportunities
Awards
News
Events
Discoveries
Publications
Advisory Committee
Career Opportunities
See Additional SBE Resources
View SBE Staff
SBE Organizations
Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS)
National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES)
Social and Economic Sciences (SES)
SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA)
Proposals and Awards
Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  Introduction
Proposal Preparation and Submission
bullet Grant Proposal Guide
  bullet Grants.gov Application Guide
Award and Administration
bullet Award and Administration Guide
Award Conditions
Other Types of Proposals
Merit Review
NSF Outreach
Policy Office
Additional SBE Resources
Exploring What Makes Us Human
Rebuilding the Mosaic Report
Bringing People Into Focus: How Social, Behavioral & Economic Research Addresses National Challenges
"Youth Violence: What We Need to Know" Report to NSF
Social, Behavioral and Economic Research in the Federal Context Report
Expedited Review of Social and Behavioral Research Activities Report
SBE Advisory Committee Web Site (for members only)
Other Site Features
Special Reports
Research Overviews
Multimedia Gallery
Classroom Resources
NSF-Wide Investments

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images

Discovery
Uncovering Trends in Public Policy-Making

Back to article | Note about images

Capital Building with inset of Policy Agendas Website.

The Policy Agendas Project collects and organizes data from various archived sources to trace changes in the national policy agenda and public policy outcomes since the Second World War.

Credit: Photos.com, inset www.policyagendas.org

 

Waving hands

Do the activities of Congress respond to those issues considered by the American public to be the most important ones facing the country? "Our research showed that when citizens become concerned about a matter, Congress holds hearings and has a pretty high probability of doing something about the problem," said Dr. Jones, Director of the Policy Agendas Project. "If I were a Congressman, this would be music to my ears."

Credit: Photodisc

 

graph

To assess the policy priorities of the mass public, the Policy Agendas Project coded "Most Important Problem" data from Gallup polls across the postwar period into categories already developed by the Project. Clearly, the public agenda is dominated by concerns of national and economic security. Civil rights occupied a prominent place in the priorities of the general public during the 1950s and 1960s but dropped from the agenda in the 1970s. Crime was prominent in the 1970s and again in the 1990s.

Credit: www.policyagendas.org


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (97 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

graph

Congressional priorities were assessed by the proportion of total hearings in a given year focusing in each of 19 major topics defined in the Project. Results showed that,while the congressional agenda is more complex, there is an impressive congruence between the priorities of the public and the priorities of Congress across time, which is reflected in lawmaking activities.

Credit: www.policyagendas.org


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (162 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Student presentation

Graduate and undergraduate students who work on datasets for the Policy Agendas Project often use the data for their own research projects. For this award-winning undergraduate project, Lindsey Scola used Policy Agendas data to ascertain that there is not a strong correlation between executive orders on volunteerism and the social services budget.

Credit: The Policy Agendas Project.

 



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page