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Discovery

Nano-engineered Powders Tackle Toxic Chemicals

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This video shows how the FAST-ACT powders work, how they are made and how they are used in situations ranging from chemical spills to gas releases in enclosed chambers.

Credit: Cliff Braverman and Trent Schindler, NSF; NanoScale Materials Inc.; Kansas State University

 

Artist's interpretation of FAST-ACT absorbing and destroying toxins

Artist's interpretation of FAST-ACT absorbing and destroying toxins

Credit: Trent Schindler, NSF


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Emergency response personnel from the Topeka, Kan., fire department test FAST-ACT

Emergency response personnel from the Topeka, Kan., fire department test FAST-ACT to determine its ability to suppress vapors from a leaking propane tank.

Credit: NanoScale Materials Inc.; NSF; Image use prohibited without approval from NanoScale.


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Emergency responder preparing to demonstrate effective use of FAST-ACT.

Manhattan, Kansas, emergency responder preparing to demonstrate effective use of FAST-ACT canister on a liquid spill.

Credit: NanoScale Materials Inc.; Manhattan Department of Fire Services; Image use prohibited without approval from NanoScale.


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FAST-ACT developer Ken Klabunde holds a canister of the powder he developed.

FAST-ACT developer Ken Klabunde holds a canister of the powder he developed in his Kansas State University laboratory.

Credit: Kansas State University


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