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Discovery
Nuclear Physics Boot Camp Preps Future Scientists

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Photo shows Exotic Beam Summer School students viewing progress of their experiments.

Student participants in the Exotic Beam Summer School gather around computer monitors to track the progress of their experiments.

Credit: Martina Matosova-Vadovska


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Photo shows data from experiments.

Data from the Exotic Beam Summer School experiments are what students inspected to find cues as they worked to discover phosphorous-35.

Credit: Thomas Baumann, NSCL


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Photo shows the NSCL's K500 cyclotron.

The K500 cyclotron, designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) in 1982, was the world's first superconducting cyclotron. It accelerates atoms at speeds approaching one tenth the speed of light and has been a model for the construction of similar accelerators around the world.

Credit: NSCL


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Photo shows the K1200 cyclotron and the K500 cyclotron together.

The K1200 cyclotron, built in 1988, was recently connected to the older K500 cyclotron to allow experiments that involve new rare-isotope extremes. The two, coupled together since 2001, bring particles to up to half the speed of light.

Credit: NSCL


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