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Discovery
Nuclear Scientists Explore the Core of Existence

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Photo of Matt Johnson, NSCL staff engineer, inspecting a 45-degree dipole magnet

Matt Johnson, staff enginer at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), inspects a 45-degree dipole magnet. The magnet, used to turn and separate nuclei, was installed in 2007, enabling researchers to continue pursuing exotic nuclei at the edge of existence.

Credit: NSCL


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Picture from the NSCL experimenters' logbook used to create three super-heavy isotopes.

Picture from the NSCL experimenters' logbook used by the researchers when they created three super-heavy isotopes of magnesium and aluminum. The scrawled note, "Let the celebrations begin!" reflects the researchers excitement at the discovery.

Credit: NSCL


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Photo showing a closeup of the exposed guts of the NSCL K500 cyclotron

This is a closeup of the exposed guts of the NSCL K500 cyclotron, the world's first superconducting cyclotron.

Credit: NSCL


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