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All Images

Discovery
My Research: I Burn Stuff

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of a pile of coal in Gansu province, China.

A pile of coal in Gansu province, China. Coal is non-renewable and, when burned, creates high levels of CO2 emissions. While farmers in the past used biomass to a great extent, use of coal in China's rural areas is increasing. China is already struggling with significant air pollution, and the increased emissions from rural coal use exacerbate the problem.

Credit: Abigail Watrous, University of Colorado at Boulder


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Photo of a coal burning stove in a village outside of Beijing blazing hot.

A coal-burning stove in a village outside of Beijing blazes hot. Roughly 700 million people, more than twice the population of the United States, living in rural areas of China, burn straw, rice husks, corn husks, corn cobs, wood or coal, with varying impacts on the environment.

Credit: Abigail Watrous, University of Colorado at Boulder


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.4 MB)

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Photo of Abigail Watrous during her travels in China.

The author, taken during her travels in China.

Credit: Abigail Watrous, University of Colorado at Boulder


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