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Discovery
Crimes to Climate History: Tiny Diatoms Offer Big Clues

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Photo of the diatom, <em>Stenopterobia curvula</em>.

Image of the diatom, Stenopterobia curvula.

Credit: Peter Siver, Connecticut College


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Photo of the surface of the pennate diatom <em>Epithemia</em>.

Close-up of the surface of the pennate diatom Epithemia, from a collection taken in the Russian Arctic.

Credit: Peter Siver, Connecticut College


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Photo of Peter Siver with numerous mosquitos his my back.

Peter Siver, with numerous and relentless mosquitos on his back, while sampling in the Russian tundra.

Credit: Peter Siver, Connecticut College


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Photo of Peter Siver using a light microscope and a computer to study diatoms

Peter Siver, Charles and Sarah P. Becker Professor of Botany and director of the Environmental Studies Program, in his office at Connecticut College in New London. Siver uses a light microscope to study diatoms and compare them to images on his computer and in scientific literature.

Credit: Brandon Mosley, Connecticut College


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