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All Images

Discovery
Water Plays Surprising Role in Climate Change

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Photo of the twisting road, Mauna Loa's lava fields and clouds.

The twisting road up Mauna Loa's lava fields rises above the clouds.

Credit: CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder


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Photo of David Noone by a vapor-collecting cryospheric trap near the Mauna Loa Observatory.

Climate scientist David Noone by a vapor-collecting cryospheric trap near the Mauna Loa Observatory.

Credit: CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder


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Photo of climate scientist Joe Galewsky.

Climate scientist Joe Galewsky enjoys a tropical break from Mauna Loa's dry, chilly air.

Credit: CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder


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Photo of David Noone next to Charles Keeling's original CO2-monitoring equipment.

Climate scientist David Noone next to Charles Keeling's original CO2-monitoring instrument.

Credit: CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder


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