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Discovery

Measuring Excitement for Carbon Nanotubes

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Image showing ball and stick model of two crossing carbon nanotubes on a graphite surface.

Ball and stick model of two crossing (10, 10) carbon nanotubes on a graphite surface.

Credit: Tobias Hertel, Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Wurzburg


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Photo showing two glass tubes filled with blue and purple liquid.

Two chirality enriched carbon nanotube suspensions, with tubes of predominantly one optical band gap.

Credit: Tobias Hertel, Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Wurzburg


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Image of a blue/red pattern on a hexagonal overlay.

Wavefunction of the lowest dipole allowed exciton in a (6,5) nanotube.

Credit: Tobias Hertel, Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Wurzburg


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Image showing a ball and stick tunneling microscope composite image of carbon nanotube.

Ball and stick scanning tunneling microscope composite image of a single wall carbon nanotube.

Credit: Tobias Hertel, Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Wurzburg


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Image showing ball and stick model of sodium cholate suspended carbon nanotube.

Ball and stick model of a sodium cholate suspended (6,5) carbon nanotube.

Credit: Tobias Hertel, Institute for Physical Chemistry, University of Wurzburg


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