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Discovery

Benefits of Sexual Reproduction Lie in Defense Against Parasites

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Photo of dabbling ducks foraging in the shallow region of Lake Alexandrina, New Zealand.

Dabbling ducks forage in the shallow region of Lake Alexandrina, New Zealand. Parasite larvae in snails are ingested by ducks, where the parasites complete their life-cycle.

Credit: Jukka Jokela, Eawag/ETH-Zurich


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Photo of Indiana University student Kayla King dissecting snails under the microscope.

Indiana University graduate student Kayla King dissects snails under the microscope.

Credit: Kayla King, Indiana University


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Photo of Curtis Lively and Jukka Jokela diving to collect snails in Lake Alexandrina, New Zealand.

Curtis Lively and Jukka Jokela dive to collect snails, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, in Lake Alexandrina, New Zealand.

Credit: Kirsten Klappert, Eawag/ETH-Zurich


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Photo shows an infected snail (top) and an uninfected snail (bottom) removed from their shells.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum is a freshwater snail that lives in New Zealand's lakes and streams. Shown are an infected snail (top) and an uninfected snail (bottom) after being removed from their shells. The spots visible on the infected snail are parasite cysts.

Credit: Gabe Harp, Indiana University


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