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All Images

Discovery
Much of U.S. Water Safe, But Problems Remain

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of a water coming out of a water fountain.

A recent study suggests that fixtures could leach lead into drinking water, even if the devices received passing grades from standard testing protocols.

Credit: Josh Chamot, National Science Foundation


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Environmental engineer Marc Edwards, of Virginia Tech University, discusses ways to improve water quality in the United States, such as having more stringent safety regulations and better methods for detecting contaminants, including lead.

Credit: NSF

 

Photo showing different types of leaded particles that can attach to screens or sampling containers.

Virginia Tech researchers examined different types of leaded particles that can attach to screens or sampling containers and may not register during testing: a) pure lead, b) lead (IV), c) solder (50:50 lead:tin), d) red brass and e) yellow brass.

Credit: Christopher Strock, Civil Engineer, Virginia Tech


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Photo of hose bibs that were used in the Virginia Tech study.

These hose bibs were used in the Virginia Tech study.

Credit: Marc Edwards, Virginia Tech


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Photo of ball valves that are examples of devices covered by the Section 8 standard.

These ball valves are examples of devices covered by the American National Standards Institute/National Sanitation Foundation 61 Section 8 standard.

Credit: Marc Edwards, Virginia Tech


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