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All Images

Discovery
Eye-to-Eye With a Blizzard ...Tornado ... Hurricane

Back to article | Note about images

Joshua Wurman, director of the Center for Severe Weather Research, gives us a glimpse of what it's like to conduct research on snowstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes and other severe storms. The Doppler-on-Wheels was integral to the success of VORTEX2, the largest scientific project in history to study tornadoes. VORTEX2 scientists followed tornadoes in the U.S. Midwest in May and June 2009 and 2010.

Credit: Harrison Miller, National Science Foundation

 

Photo of the Doppler-on-Wheels (DOW).

Eye-to-eye with a storm: the Doppler-on-Wheels (DOW) stands tall against the elements.

Credit: NSSL/NOAA


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Image of a snowdrift on the side of a house.

"Historic" snowstorms are the norm in Oswego, N.Y.; DOW will be there, in Jan/Feb 2011.

Credit: NOAA


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Photo of a tornado on the horizon and the DOW in the foreground.

Tornado on the horizon: just where the DOW and its crew hope to be stationed.

Credit: Josh Wurman


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Photo of a storm in the background and trees in the foreground.

Maysville, Missouri: Will an approaching storm spawn a tornado? DOW is at the ready.

Credit: Patrick Dacquel


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Photo of the DOW waiting as a storm develops over Maysville.

DOW watches and waits as the storm develops over Maysville.

Credit: Patrick Dacquel


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Photo of scientists Karen Kosiba and Josh Wurman tracking severe storms in the DOW truck.

A long day in the DOW truck: scientists Karen Kosiba and Josh Wurman track severe storms.

Credit: Josh Wurman


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