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Discovery
Miracle Material

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Optical micrograph showing an array of graphene transistors prepared on silicon carbide.

Optical micrograph of an array of graphene transistors prepared on silicon carbide (SiC). There are 40,000 devices per square centimeter.

Credit: M. Sprinkle, M. Ruan,Y. Hu, J. Hankinson,M. Rubio-Roy, B. Zhang, X. Wu, C. Berger & W. A. de Heer. (2010). Scalable templated growth of graphene nanoribbons on SiC. Nature Nanotechnology (5), 727-731.


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Photo of students observing a high-temperature furnace used to produce graphene on a silicon wafer.

Georgia Tech graduate students Yike Hu and John Hankinson observe a high-temperature furnace used to produce graphene on a silicon wafer.

Credit: Gary Meek, Georgia Institute of Technology


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Image of graphene platelets around silicon nitride grain boundaries.

Wrapping of graphene platelets around silicon nitride grain boundaries. The graphene platelets are able to deflect propagating cracks thereby toughening the ceramic by over 200 percent.

Credit: Nikhil Koratkar, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Erica Corral, University of Arizona


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