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All Images

Discovery
Mission Possible: Adding Engineering to the K-12 Curriculum

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of children studying the feet of a leopard gecko.

At the Sciencenter in Ithaca, N.Y., a NISE Net partner, children study the feet of a leopard gecko. Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, managed by the University of California, Berkeley,--also a NISE Net affiliate--are studying the nano-sized hairs on gecko feet to make synthetic sticky tape.

Credit: Gary Hodges for the NISE Network


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Photo of people exploring nanoscale coatings in a professional workshop.

NISE Net partners explore the properties of nanoscale coatings in a professional workshop at the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, a NISE Net partner.

Credit: Emily Maletz for the NISE Network


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Photo of Bob Imber with his fourth-grade students working on designing solar ovens.

Using the Engineering is Elementary® curriculum, teacher Bob Imber gives materials to his fourth-grade students at the Rice Square School in Worcester, Mass. They will work as green engineers to design solar ovens that are effective at getting and staying hot and have minimal environmental impact.

Credit: Engineering is Elementary, Museum of Science, Boston


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Photo of children talking about a model of a carbon nanotube.

Nanoscientists can manipulate matter at the scale of atoms and molecules. Children at the Sciencenter in Ithaca, N.Y.--a NISE Net partner--talk about a model of a carbon nanotube.

Credit: Gary Hodges for the NISE Network


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Photo of Ioannis Miaoulis, president and director of the Museum of Science in Boston.

Ioannis Miaoulis is president and director of the Museum of Science in Boston.

Credit: Reena Bammi for the Museum of Science, Boston


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