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Discovery
On World Environment Day and Every Day, the Stress of Being Ginseng

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Painting of the herb American ginseng

The unassuming herb American ginseng, hidden in cool woodlands.

Credit: Susan Bull Riley


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Scientist James McGraw next to American ginseng in the wild

Scientist James McGraw on the level with the subject of his research: American ginseng.

Credit: James McGraw, West Virginia University


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A forest of the northeastern U.S. with american ginseng plants

Typical American ginseng habitat: the deciduous forests of the northeastern U.S.

Credit: James McGraw, West Virginia University


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Close-up photo of American ginseng plant with red berries

Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng) with berries; Panax translates to "all healing."

Credit: USFWS


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captured image of a wood thrush eating a ginseng berry

A wood thrush eating a ginseng berry; the birds are important ginseng seed dispersers.

Credit: James McGraw, West Virginia University


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Researcher Kerry Wixted next to invasive plants in an American ginseng habitat

Researcher Kerry Wixted studying the effects of invasive plants on American ginseng.

Credit: James McGraw, West Virginia University


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