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Discovery

"Talking" to the animals

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Photo of marine organisms under water

Chemical signals are the primary "language" used by ocean organisms to communicate.

Credit: Mark Hay


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Photo of a marine animal and plants under water

Using a kind of "ESP," marine animals and plants react to other species based on chemical cues.

Credit: Mark Hay


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Photo of varios marine organisms in the ocean

Scientists are studying how chemical signals play a part in ocean ecosystems.

Credit: Mark Hay


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Photo of researchers' base camp  surrounded by banana trees and clothes out to dry in Fiji.

Ecologist Mark Hay and colleagues conduct research on Fiji; its islands are their "base camp."

Credit: Mark Hay


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Photo of a starfish on a rock under water

Eat, fight with, run from or mate with? For most marine species, the answer lies in biochemistry.

Credit: Mark Hay


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Map showing Fiji islands next to Australia

Researchers have studied more than 800 species in the waters around Fiji's many islands.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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