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The engineering behind additive manufacturing and the 3-D printing revolution

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3-D printing is an innovative manufacturing technique developed by Professors Michael Cima and Emanuel Sachs from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Once used just to create working prototypes, 3-D printers are now used by people from engineers to home inventors to make objects from their imaginations.

Credit: NSF and NBC Learn


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The White House has identified advanced manufacturing as a national priority. But what does advanced manufacturing mean? Engineer Thomas Kurfess, who served as the Assistant Director for Advanced Manufacturing in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President, tells us.

Credit: NSF


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How do we make thoughts into reality? Mass produce it. Engineer Thomas Kurfess, who served as the Assistant Director for Advanced Manufacturing in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President, tells us why mass manufacturing is key to making the world a better place.

Credit: NSF


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