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Discovery
Desert dwellers and 'bots reveal physics of movement

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loggerhead sea turtle

After climbing out of their nests, hatchling loggerhead sea turtles make their way to the sea. "The best robots . . . can't out-compete a hatchling sea turtle whose life consists of swimming all the time and using these appendages on land only for half an hour, running from the nest," says physicist Daniel Goldman.

Credit: GSTC Turtle Patrol


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a sandfish in the sand

The CRAB lab studies how animals like this sandfish move on and in sand. Findings are relevant to robotics, among other areas of study.

Credit: Daniel Goldman


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Researchers at Georgia Tech's CRAB lab study how animals move on and in granular media such as sand. Their findings could help engineers build more agile search and rescue and other robots.

Credit: NSF


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