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Discovery - Video
What makes a good math teacher?

What makes a good math teacher? A teacher who "not only knows her math, but loves teaching as well," says Sarah Irvine Belson, dean of education at American University. Irvine Belson, Maxine Singer and John Nolan are principal investigators for Math for America (MfA) DC, a program that selects college graduates with an interest in teaching and math, and provides them with one year of training, mentorship and professional development before placing them in high-needs schools for four years. Math for America has chapters across the United States, and with the help of the National Science Foundation, there is a chapter in the nation's capital. The D.C. chapter is a partnership between American University and the Carnegie Institution for Science.

Credit: Amy Fenton, National Science Foundation

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