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Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET) Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 31-55 of 55) | Search Discoveries

Photo showing bright red-orange photoluminescence from porous silicon nanoparticles. Safer Nano Cancer Detector
Nanoparticle test in mice could pave the way for human uses
Released  April 30, 2009
Eight thumbnail images and 2008 in Review 2008: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities that made news last year
Released  March 13, 2009
Photo of water coming out of a faucet. Clean Water for a Crowded, Contaminated World
Revolutionary purification techniques address impending global water crisis
Released  February 2, 2009
Photo of Raul Cal modeling the cool laser eye-protecting glasses used during the experiments. Lab Tests Show Wind Turbine's Air Flow
Researcher describes NSF-supported wind tunnel experiments that mimic atmospheric airflow around wind turbines to advance our understanding of real wind farm conditions
Released  November 25, 2008
Photo of Ayusman Sen's laboratory team in 2008. Nanoparticles Taught to Swim
NSF-supported research team at Penn State creates nanoscale motors powered by catalytic reactions that convert chemical energy into motion
Released  November 20, 2008
Photo of Jonathan Arnold and Heinz-Bernd Schuttler discussing their work on biological clocks. The Biological Clock's Incredible Influence Revealed
University of Georgia researchers find that the number of genes under the control of the biological clock in bread mold is dramatically higher than previously reported
Released  November 5, 2008
Three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance images of the rat gastro-intestinal tract. Gut Reaction: Digestion Revealed in 3-D
James Brasseur and his multidisciplinary team image the dynamic mixing of fluids and nutrient exchange in the human digestive system
Released  October 17, 2008
Illustration of a bioparticle (left) ready to bind antigens (yellow) from tumor cells. Natural Bio-Army Trained to Fight Cancer
Bioengineer Tarek Fahmy and colleagues are engineering new nanoscopic and microscopic biomaterials to stimulate the body’s production of killer T-cells to fight infectious diseases
Released  August 8, 2008
Photo of Todd McDevitt pointing to an aggregate of embryonic stem cells with blue-stained nuclei. Stem Cell Research Goes Beyond Biology
Todd McDevitt tells how engineering can help us understand stem cell differentiation and develop approaches to realize the potential of stem cells for regenerative therapies
Released  July 17, 2008
Photo of Professor Israel Wachs with the combined Raman-Infrared spectrometer/microscope. Scientist Explores Invisible Environmental Helpers
Researcher uses his expertise in catalysis to impact major environmental issues
Released  April 25, 2008
2007 In Review 2007: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities reported last year
Released  January 30, 2008
Researchers have created bricks from fly ash that look and perform like normal bricks. Follow the "Green" Brick Road?
Bricks made from coal-fired power plant waste pass safety test
Released  May 22, 2007
"NanoBucky" is a 3-D nanoscale model made from tiny, carbon nanofiber "hairs." Getting a Feel for the Nano World
New models help introduce the blind to careers in nanoscale science and engineering
Released  March 27, 2007
Princeton REU student Claire Woo at work in the laboratory of Jay Benziger. Hydrogen-Powered Lawnmowers?
New design could open door to small-scale fuel cells
Released  January 22, 2007
Researchers hold the polymer that is critical to their water filtration system. You Still Can't Drink the Water, But Now You Can Touch It
Laboratory filtration system kills 100 percent of dangerous microbes in water taken from Hurricane Katrina disaster
Released  January 9, 2007
Silicon-oxygen nanoparticles aggregate to form zeolites. Crystal Sieves, Born Anew
Hard data resolves decades-old mystery of how certain zeolites form
Released  April 17, 2006
Screen shot from animation showing diffusion High-Tech Sieve Sifts for Hydrogen
New polymer use may yield cheaper way to separate hydrogen from impurities
Released  February 2, 2006
This image shows copper in ore and a penny. Managing Metal
New study raises questions about sustainability of metal resources
Released  January 17, 2006
Water travels through carbon nanotubes faster than models predict. Slippery When Wet
Fluids race through nearly frictionless carbon nanotubes
Released  November 10, 2005
The crew of the B'Quest before their departure Overcoming Adversity, "Challenged America" Team Finishes Strong
Released  July 26, 2005
Jim Halverson, one of the Challenged America crew, boards the <i>B'Quest</i> Ability, Not Disability, at Heart of Yacht Trek
Student projects help physically challenged sailors competitively race across Pacific
Released  July 11, 2005
Some day, nanowires routed to the brain through the circulatory system may help patients. Wiring the Brain at the Nanoscale
Nanowires in blood vessels may help monitor, stimulate neurons in the brain
Released  July 7, 2005
A Duke University researcher studies the properties of granular materials. The Shifty Nature of Grains
Qualities of granular materials provide insight into both nature and industry
Released  June 22, 2005
Illustration shows how a tiny needle full of carbon nanotubes could work as glucose sensor. The Tiniest Test Kits: A Medical Future for Carbon Nanotubes?
Imagine if diabetics could read blood-glucose levels by reading a watch. Or if researchers could monitor hormone levels, in real-time, in their subjects. What sounds like science fiction today could be reality soon, thanks to carbon nanotubes.
Released  May 20, 2005
close-up of wheat Researchers Find Trigger for Devastating Digestive Disease and Propose a Possible Treatment
Researchers discover what triggers severe inflammation of the intestine in people with celiac sprue, a common genetic disease that, if untreated, can lead to malnutrition and worse, and they propose a potential treatment.
Released  July 25, 2003

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