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Chemistry & Materials Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

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Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 61-87 of 87)

Photo of a researcher in a lab. Math Could Aid in Curing Cancer
Scientists and medical doctors couple math and medicine for unusual, promising marriage
Released  August 4, 2008
Computer image of the CB[7] Ferrocene molecular container. Chemist 'Really Jazzed' About Creating New Molecules
Lyle Isaacs talks about cool things that chemists do, such as his work to build new molecular containers that are as good as what is found in nature
Released  July 18, 2008
Photo of the CTD/rosette that contains sampling bottles and instruments. How Desert Dust Feeds the World's Oceans
Scientists sample dust and trace metals in seawater to learn more about climatic change
Released  May 9, 2008
2007 In Review 2007: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities reported last year
Released  January 30, 2008
Photo of Shirley Ann Jackson and William Bialek Top Scientists Promote Innovative, Multidisciplinary Global Problem-Solving Strategies
 
Released  December 11, 2007
Nattharika Aumsuwan and Marek Urban, part of team who developed antibiotic coating process. New Coating Could Prevent Infection From Surgical Tools and Implants
Development of penicillin-coated surfaces could save thousands of lives from infection
Released  September 7, 2007
Photo of a man in front of one of the pyramids The Surprising Truth Behind the Construction of the Great Pyramids
Were the stone blocks carved from natural limestone or cast with an early version of concrete? A materials science research team provides evidence to answer this age-old mystery.
Released  May 18, 2007
2006 in Review 2006: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported activities highlighted last year
Released  January 9, 2007
Jackeline Quinones Fueling Ideas in Global Environmental Collaboration
Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute melds student teams and experts for a fresh look at fuel cell design and emissions control
Released  October 18, 2006
Electrons hitting an iron-carbide filled carbon nanotube cause it to contract and extrude material. Nanotubes Not for Toothpaste . . . Yet
Researchers Squeeze Even Rock-Hard Materials Through Minuscule Carbon Tubes
Released  July 25, 2006
With strong magnetic fields and cold temperatures, magnetic order in barium-copper silicate emerges. Purple Haze
Ancient pigment reveals secrets about unusual state of matter
Released  July 11, 2006
Students from across the Middle East grapple with a chemistry problem at the Petra workshop. Bonding in the Middle East
Nobel chemist helps young scientists across the region strengthen ties, work together
Released  April 6, 2006
Vesicle membranes that collapse when cooled may someday deliver minute payloads of medicines. Micro Pills Could Deliver Drugs on Demand
Temperature-sensitive capsules release chemicals at tightly controlled rates
Released  March 27, 2006
This thumbprint appeared after researchers sprayed it with a super glue. From Fingerprints to Fiberprints
Forensic technique leads to new method for creating nanofibers
Released  February 15, 2006
The challenge is to assign each grant application to the appropriate reviewers. Computer Program Streamlines Complex Work Scheduling
Chemical engineers develop an algorithm that could transform scheduling
Released  December 6, 2005
The new nanofountain probe produced these patterns; features are as thin as 40 nanometers The World’s Smallest Fountain Pen?
New microscope tips use capillary action to print patterns tens of nanometers across
Released  October 5, 2005
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Univeristy produced a sample of the modified collagen. Modified Collagen Could Be a Boon for Medicine
Altered protein could help shape the growth of engineered tissue
Released  September 20, 2005
Illustration shows how a tiny needle full of carbon nanotubes could work as glucose sensor. The Tiniest Test Kits: A Medical Future for Carbon Nanotubes?
Imagine if diabetics could read blood-glucose levels by reading a watch. Or if researchers could monitor hormone levels, in real-time, in their subjects. What sounds like science fiction today could be reality soon, thanks to carbon nanotubes.
Released  May 20, 2005
FAST-ACT crystals Nano-engineered Powders Tackle Toxic Chemicals
Thirsty grains act fast to clean up messes
Released  April 28, 2005
Illustration shows circular mechanical valve inside heart. Artificial Heart Valves Face the Curdled Milk Test
A graduate student and her colleagues have developed what they think is a better way to test artificial heart valves. Using curdled milk as a blood substitute, their approach could improve preclinical testing of new devices, saving money and lives.
Released  April 26, 2005
traffic on highway It’s Elemental: Detecting Toxicity in a Controversial Fuel Additive
U.S.-German Team Develops New Analytical Technique
Released  January 27, 2005
Sampling the Atacama Of Microbes and Mars
Desert microbe discovery has extraterrestrial implications
Released  December 17, 2004
illustration of Hydrogen atom and its antimatter mirror image Researchers Get First Look into Antimatter Atoms
Physicists have probed the properties of whole atoms of antimatter, the "mirror image" of matter, providing the first look inside an antimatter atom and taking a big step on the way to testing standard theories of how the universe operates.
Released  July 30, 2004
electron microscope image of a colloidosome Researchers Solve 100-Year-Old Puzzle of How Layer of Particles Coats the Surface of a Sphere
Researchers have discovered how nature arranges charged particles in a thin layer around a sphere. Understanding this theoretical problem may help reveal chinks in the armor of viruses and bacteria and guide engineers designing new molecules.
Released  July 30, 2004
Blue Mountains funnel-web spider Spider Venom Could Yield Eco-Friendly Insecticides
You could call Glenn King "The Spider Man." The University of Connecticut research scientist is mapping spider toxins at the molecular level. His work may result in an insecticide that takes out agricultural pests without harming other insects.
Released  May 3, 2004
close-up of wheat Researchers Find Trigger for Devastating Digestive Disease and Propose a Possible Treatment
Researchers discover what triggers severe inflammation of the intestine in people with celiac sprue, a common genetic disease that, if untreated, can lead to malnutrition and worse, and they propose a potential treatment.
Released  July 25, 2003
Eleutherobia species of coral Finding Cures from Corals
A chemical that protects a rare type of marine coral from predators may also prove to be a potent medicine for humans in the fight against cancer.
Released  July 18, 2003

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