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Cyberinfrastructure for Engineering Research and Education

Cyberinfrastructure for Engineering Research and Education

A Workshop Sponsored by the National Science Foundation
June 5 - June 6, 2003

Disclaimer: The materials presented in workshop reports and proceedings do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the National Science Foundation.

Table of Contents

  • Purpose
  • Key issues
  • Agenda - with links to presentations
  • Attendees - with links to contact information and Personal Points of View (PPV) papers.
  • Break Out Session Reports
    - #1

    1A final version

    1B final version

- #2 final version
- #3 final version

Purpose

NSF is hosting this workshop to provide preliminary input to the Directorate for Engineering in considering how to best make investments that support the creation and use of new cyberinfrastructure capabilities to support engineering research and education over the next decade. This workshop is intended as an initial step in to develop a conceptual framework for defining community needs, identifying key issues and means of addressing them. At this meeting, it is not intended to build a consensus for a fully defined proposal or plan, but rather to identify opportunities through stimulating a constructive dialogue among scientists, engineers and educators from different engineering communities, and between engineers, scientists and information scientists and technologists.

The product of the workshop will be a white paper that examines needs and opportunities for applying cyberinfrastructure in engineering research and education, identifies significant issues, and provides a roadmap for addressing key outstanding issues. The white paper will be published on the NSF website. Up ^

 

Key Issues

  • How will investments in cyberinfrastructure spur major advances in engineering research and education?
  • For what types of research and education activities (provide examples) will cyberinfrastructure be critical, and what characteristics will be required of the cyberinfrastructure. Where are the major challenges?
  • How can an effective partnership between computer scientists and engineering researchers and educators be developed to best provide the needed cyberinfrastructure?
  • Develop a general road map for future investments in cyberinfrastructure. What investments need to come first and why? What payoffs can be expected? Provide input on cost estimates to implement the road map.
  • What organizational structure is needed to provide long-term support for cyberinfrastructure development?
  • What should be the path forward regarding future workshops and other activities? What information is needed to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps important for decisionmaking about NSF’s cyberinfrastructure investments?

Up ^

Agenda with presentations.

Note: Links pull up MS PowerPoint files.

June 5, 2003 (in 1235 at NSF)

5:00 to 7:30 “The NSF Advisory Committee on Cyberinfrastructure," (2.7 MB) Kelvin Droegemeier, University of Oklahoma

June 6, 2003 (in 1235 at NSF)

8:30-10:15 Plenary Session #1

8:30 Welcome and the View from NSF (85 KB) – John Brighton, Assistant Director, ENG

8:40 Introduction/Goals for the Workshop (2.63 MB) – Priscilla Nelson, Senior Advisor, ENG.

8:50 Cyberinfrastructure as a priority area (426 KB) – Deborah Crawford, Deputy Assistant Director, CISE

9:10 Cyberinfrastructure (13.91 MB) – Kyran Mish, University of Oklahoma

9:30 Cybercommunity Growth in Geoscience (16.96 MB) – Stephen Meacham, GEO

9:50 Disasters and Response (1.21 MB) – Yigal Arens, ISI/USC

10:15-10:30 Break

10:30-11:45 Plenary Session #2

10:30 George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) (1.01 MB) or (13.5 MB with annimations) – Cherri Pancake, Oregon State University

10:55 Network for Computational Nanotechnology (1.2 MB) – Mark Lundstrom, Purdue University and Jose Fortes, (1.14 MB) University of Florida

11:25 Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER) (4.26 MB) – Patrick Brezonik, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

11:45-1:45 Lunch and Concurrent Breakout Session A:

Session A Topic: Defining Needs and Opportunities for the Engineering Research and Education Communities
· Breakout #1: Data: Collecting, Accessing, Using
· Breakout #2: Analysis, Modeling and Simulation
· Breakout #3: Collaboration Tools for Research and Education
Each breakout session will address the following set of common questions:

  • How will investments in cyberinfrastructure spur major advances in engineering research and education?
  • For what types of research and education activities (provide examples) will cyberinfrastructure be critical, and what characteristics will be required of the cyberinfrastructure? Where are the major challenges?
  • How can an effective partnership between computer scientists and engineering researchers and educators be developed to best provide the needed cyberinfrastructure?

1:45-2:15 Reassemble into Plenary Session: Reports from Breakout Groups

2:15-2:30 Break and move to next breakout sessions

2:30-4:15 Concurrent Breakout Session B

Session B Topic: Implementation Challenges and Opportunities
· Breakout #1: Data: Collecting, Accessing, Using
· Breakout #2: Analysis, Modeling and Simulation
· Breakout #3: Collaboration Tools for Research and Education
Each breakout session will address the following set of common questions:

  • Develop a general road map for future investments in cyberinfrastructure. What investments need to come first and why? What payoffs can be expected? Provide input on cost estimates to implement the road map.
  • What organizational structure is needed to provide long-term support for cyberinfrastructure development?
  • What should be the path forward regarding future workshops and other activities? What information is needed to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps important for decisionmaking about NSF’s cyberinfrastructure investments?

4:15-4:45 Reassemble into Plenary Session: Reports from Breakout Groups

4:45-5:00 Summary and Closure

· Workshop Summary Document – Kyran Mish, University of Oklahoma

· Closing thoughts – John Brighton, Assistant Director for Engineering

Up ^

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