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Division of Undergraduate Education

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education  (IUSE: EHR)

CONTACTS

Name Email Phone Room
Myles  G. Boylan mboylan@nsf.gov (703) 292-4617   
Terry  S. Woodin twoodin@nsf.gov (703) 292-4657   
Connie  K. Della-Piana cdellapi@nsf.gov (703) 292-5309   
Katherine  J. Denniston kdennist@nsf.gov (703) 292-8496   

For specific disciplinary questions proposers are encouraged to contact a Program Officer in their discipline.

Biological Sciences

  • Kathleen Bergin, telephone: (703)292-5171, email: kbergin@nsf.gov
  • Celeste Carter, telephone: (703)292-4651, email: vccarter@nsf.gov
  • Kate Denniston, telephone: (703)292-8496, email: kdennist@nsf.gov
  • Terry Woodin, telephone: (703)292-4657, email: twoodin@nsf.gov

        BIO: Division of Biological Infrastructure

  • Charles Sullivan, telephone: (703) 292-7121, email: csulliva@nsf.gov        

Chemistry

Computer Science

Engineering

        ENG: Division of Engineering Education & Centers (EEC)

  • Donna M. Riley, telephone: (703) 292-7107, email: driley@nsf.gov            

Geological Sciences

        GEO: Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)

  • Elizabeth L. Rom, telephone: (703) 292-7709, email: elrom@nsf.gov       

Interdisciplinary

Mathematics

Physics / Astronomy

Research/Evaluation/Assessment

Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences

PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Solicitation  14-588

Important Information for Proposers

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 15-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after December 26, 2014. The PAPPG is consistent with, and, implements the new Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance) (2 CFR 200). NSF anticipates release of the PAPPG in the Fall of 2014. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 15-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.

DUE DATES

Full Proposal Deadline Date:  January 13, 2015

Engaged Student Learning: Design and Development, I & II

Full Proposal Deadline Date:  January 13, 2015

Institutional and Community Transformation: Design and Development

SYNOPSIS

 

A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation's health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience. In addressing these STEM challenges and priorities, the National Science Foundation invests in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understanding STEM learning; to designing, testing, and studying instruction and curricular change; to wide dissemination and implementation of best practices; and to broadening participation of individuals and institutions in STEM fields. The goals of these investments include: increasing the number and diversity of STEM students, preparing students well to participate in science for tomorrow, and improving students' STEM learning outcomes.

The Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) program invites proposals that address immediate challenges and opportunities that are facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g. organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise.  The IUSE program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.    

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation.  Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and (ii) Design and Development. These tracks will entertain research studies in all areas. In addition, IUSE also offers support for a variety of focused innovative projects that seek to identify future opportunities and challenges facing the undergraduate STEM education enterprise.

REVISIONS AND UPDATES

What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program

Events



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