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A

AERONOMY

Description

The Aeronomy Program supports research from the mesosphere to the outer reaches of the thermosphere and all regions of the Earth’s ionosphere.  The Aeronomy Program seeks to understand phenomena of ionization, recombination, chemical reaction, photo emission, and the transport of energy, and momentum within and between these regions. The program also supports research into the coupling of this global system to the stratosphere below and magnetosphere above and the plasma physics of phenomena manifested in the coupled ionosphere-magnetosphere system, including the effects of high-power radio wave modification.

The Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Program aims to understand changes in the atmosphere over short and long time scales. CEDAR is consistent with the recommendations and goals of the NAS Decadal Survey "Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society" (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13060). A primary goal of CEDAR is to explain how energy is transferred between atmospheric regions by combining a comprehensive observational program with theoretical and empirical modeling efforts.  A data base of CEDAR observations is maintained for community use (http://cedar.openmadrigal.org/). The annual CEDAR Workshop attracts over 300 scientists including a large number of graduate students and as well as many international collaborators.

Contacts
Anne-Marie Schmoltner   aschmolt@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Accepted Anytime

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



ANTARCTIC GLACIOLOGY

Description

Snow and ice are pervasive elements of high-latitude environmental systems and have an active role in the global environment. The glaciology program is concerned with the study of the history and dynamics of all naturally occurring forms of snow and ice, including floating ice shelves, glaciers, and continental and marine ice sheets. Program emphases include paleoenvironments from ice cores, ice dynamics, numerical modeling, glacial geology, and remote sensing of ice sheets. Some specific objectives are:

  • correlating climatic fluctuations evident in antarctic ice cores with data from arctic and lower-latitude ice cores, and integrating the ice record with the terrestrial and marine record;
  • documenting the geographic extent of climatic events noted in paleoclimatic records and the extension of the ice core time series to provide information on astronomical forcing of climate;
  • establishing more precise dating methodologies for deep ice cores;
  • determining the Cenozoic history of antarctic ice sheets and their interaction with global climate and uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains and the response of the antarctic ice sheets to the Pliocene warming;
  • investigating the physics of fast glacier flow with emphasis on processes at glacier beds;
  • investigating ice-shelf stability;
  • identifying and quantifying the feedback between ice dynamics and climate change.

These topics come together in the multidisciplinary West Antarctic Ice Sheet program (WAIS), a major initiative of the Division of Polar Programs. The program, focused in the Antarctic Glaciology Program and the Antarctic Earth Sciences Program, is designed to advance understanding of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Scientists involved in the WAIS program want to know what triggers marine ice sheet collapse and evaluate the possibility that this could happen in West Antarctica. Predicting the ice sheet's future behavior requires an understanding of its history, current state (including the nature of the bed), internal dynamics, and coupling to the current global climate.

Ice cores from Antarctica are important for determining whether the rapid climate changes recorded in Northern Hemisphere ice cores, such as those obtained from Summit, Greenland, in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project II (GISP2), are global in extent. Plans are underway to drill a deep ice core at a site on the ice divide in West Antarctica, as part of the WAISCORES program, with both thick ice and high annual accumulation. This is the only antarctic site where scientists can obtain an ice core capable of providing a long, annual resolution history of Southern Hemisphere climate in which compressed snow layers are thick enough to allow absolute dating. The WAIS Divide ice core will provide a Southern Hemisphere equivalent to the GISP2, GRIP (the European Greenland Ice Core Project), and North GRIP ice cores and will allow detailed comparison of environmental conditions between the northern and southern hemispheres.

The ice cores to be drilled as part of the WAISCORES program will complement those already under study from Byrd Station and Siple Dome in West Antarctica and Taylor Dome and Vostok Station in East Antarctica. Ice cores are unique in that they contain continuous, or nearly continuous, records of annual precipitation, atmospheric temperature and components of the atmosphere, including gases as well as soluble and insoluble aerosol particles from a variety of sources (biogenic, terrestrial, solar, marine, volcanic, anthropogenic).

Another important activity within the Antarctic Glaciology Program is the International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE), a multi-disciplinary, multi-investigator project whose broad aim is to establish how the recent atmospheric environment (climate and atmospheric composition) is represented in the upper layers of the antarctic ice sheet. Primary emphasis is placed on approximately the last 200 years of the record. This time period was chosen because it covers the onset of major anthropogenic release of combustion products to the atmosphere and the end of the Little Ice Age.

Ice cores collected under the Antarctic Glaciology Program are currently stored at the National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL). NICL, a government-owned facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the ice-covered regions of the world, is supported through an Interagency Cooperative Agreement with the United States Geological Survey. NICL provides NSF- and USGS-funded principal investigators and their collaborators with the capability to examine and measure ice cores while preserving the integrity of these cores in a protected environment.

Another main area of interest is determining the Cenozoic history of the antarctic ice sheet, including the uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains and its interaction with global climate (e.g., response to the Pliocene warming). Much of the glacial geological research in the Transantarctic Mountains relate to understanding the history of the ice sheet during the Pliocene, as well as more recent fluctuations during the Quaternary.

Ice Coring and Drilling Services (ICDS) at University of Wisconsin, Madison, is supported by the Division of Polar Programs to meet the drilling requirements of all of the Division of Polar Programs programs. ICDS focuses on ice drill development for NSF-supported remote field projects. Investigators who plan to request technical support from ICDS should include with their proposal a cost estimate (budget and justification) for the equipment or drilling support that would be required from ICDS if the project is funded. This information is in addition to the regular budgets included with the proposal. Investigators should contact ICDS if they have questions or need further information for a correct cost estimate. (See the Related Link Section on this page for additional information.) The Research Support Manager in Polar Programs Antarctic Infrastructure and Logistics Section, as well as the program manager to whom you are submitting your proposal, should be notified when an investigator is requesting ICDS support.

Contacts
Julie Palais   jpalais@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Polar Programs (PLR)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Deadline Date: June 2, 2005

Full Proposal — Deadline Date: June 7, 2006

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



ANTARCTIC OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

Description

Antarctic oceanic and tropospheric studies focus on the structure and processes of the ocean-atmosphere environment and their relationships with the global ocean, the atmosphere, and the marine biosphere. As part of the global heat engine, the Antarctic has a major role in the world's transfer of energy. Its ocean/atmosphere system is known to be both an indicator and a component of climate change.

Research sponsored by the Antarctic Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences  program is intended to improve understanding of the oceanic environment at high latitudes, including global exchange of heat, salt, water, and trace elements, sea-ice dynamics, and tropospheric chemistry and dynamics. Major program elements include:

  • Physical oceanography, concerned with understanding the dynamics and kinematics of the polar oceans, the effects of interface driving forces such as wind, solar radiation, and heat exchange, water-mass production and modification processes, ocean dynamics at the pack ice edge, and the effect of polynyas on ventilation.

  • Chemical oceanography, concerned with chemical composition of sea water and its global speciation, reactions among chemical elements and compounds in the ocean, fluxes of material within ocean basins and at their boundaries, and the use of chemical tracers to study time and space scales of oceanic processes.
  • Sea ice dynamics, including study of the material characteristics of sea ice down to the individual crystal level and the large-scale patterns of freezing, deformation, and melting. These processes have implications for both atmospheric and oceanic "climates." Advances in instrumentation, including remote sensing or telemetering of ice type, thickness, motion, and growth, should enable large scale dynamics of sea ice to be monitored over long periods.
  • Meteorology, concerned with atmospheric circulation systems and dynamics. Research areas include the energy budget; atmospheric chemistry; transport of atmospheric contaminants to the Antarctic; and the role of large and mesoscale systems in global exchange of heat, momentum, and trace constituents.

Contacts
Peter Milne   pmilne@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Polar Programs (PLR)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Deadline Date: June 2, 2005

Full Proposal — Deadline Date: June 7, 2006

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



B

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Description

The Biological Oceanography Program supports research in marine ecology broadly defined: relationships among aquatic organisms and their interactions with the environments of the oceans or Great Lakes. Projects submitted to the program for consideration are often interdisciplinary efforts that may include participation by other OCE Programs.  (See information provided under Related URLs below).

Contacts
David Garrison   dgarriso@nsf.gov
Michael Sieracki   msierack@nsf.gov
Cynthia Suchman   csuchman@nsf.gov
Daniel Thornhill   dthornhi@nsf.gov
Julie Kellner   jkellner@nsf.gov
Gayle Pugh   gpugh@nsf.gov
Joann King   jking@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, Effective 1998 to 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, Effective 2016 to 2025

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, Effective 2016 to 2025


Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, Effective 1998 to 2005


Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 1999

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2000

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2001

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2002

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2003

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2004

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 18, 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2021

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2022

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2023

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2024

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 17, 2025

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 17, 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 16, 2021

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2022

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2023

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2024

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2025

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2007

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2009

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2010

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2013

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 1999

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2000

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2001

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2002

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2003

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2004

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2013

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2007

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2009

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2010

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



C

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Description

The Chemical Oceanography Program supports research into the chemical components, reaction mechanisms, and geochemical pathways within the ocean and at its interfaces with the solid earth and the atmosphere. Major emphases include:  studies of material inputs to and outputs from marine waters; orthochemical and biological production and transformation of chemical compounds and phases within the marine system; and the determination of reaction rates and study of equilibria. The Program encourages research into the chemistry, distribution, and fate of inorganic and organic substances introduced into or produced within marine environments including those from estuarine waters to the deep sea.

Contacts
Donald Rice   drice@nsf.gov
Simone Metz   smetz@nsf.gov
William Miller   wmiller@nsf.gov
Anna Manyak   amanyak@nsf.gov
Joann King   jking@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)


Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, Effective 2009 to 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, Effective 2009 to 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 1999

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2000

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2001

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2002

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2003

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2004

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2007

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2001

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2002

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2003

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2004

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2007

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 1999

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2000

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2010

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2013

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2016

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2010

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2013

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2016

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2019

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



CLIMATE AND LARGE-SCALE DYNAMICS

Description

The goals of the Program are to: (i) advance knowledge about the processes that force and regulate the atmosphere’s synoptic and planetary circulation, weather and climate, and (ii) sustain the pool of human resources required for excellence in synoptic and global atmospheric dynamics and climate research.

Research topics include theoretical, observational and modeling studies of the general circulation of the stratosphere and troposphere; synoptic scale weather phenomena; processes that govern climate; the causes of climate variability and change; methods to predict climate variations; extended weather and climate predictability; development and testing of parameterization of physical processes; numerical methods for use in large-scale weather and climate models; the assembly and analysis of instrumental and/or modeled weather and climate data; data assimilation studies; development and use of climate models to diagnose and simulate climate and its variations and change.

Some Climate and Large Scale Dynamics (CLD) proposals address multidisciplinary problems and are often co-reviewed with other NSF programs, some of which, unlike CLD, use panels in addition to mail reviewers, and thus have target dates or deadlines.  Proposed research that spans in substantive ways topics appropriate to programs in other divisions at NSF, e.g., ocean sciences, ecological sciences, hydrological sciences, geography and regional sciences, applied math and statistics, etc., must be submitted at times consistent with target dates or deadlines established by those programs.  If it's not clear whether your proposed research is appropriate for co-review, please contact CLD staff.

Contacts
Anjuli Bamzai   abamzai@nsf.gov
Eric DeWeaver   edeweave@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Accepted Anytime

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



D

E

ECOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIONARY PHYSIOLOGY

Description
Supports research that addresses ecological or evolutionary questions in the areas of morphology, comparative physiology, physiological ecology and biomechanics of plants, animals, protists, fungi and bacteria. The emphasis is study of whole organisms which may be living or extinct. These studies focus largely on how physiological or morphological mechanisms have evolved, and how they may influence evolutionary pathways or interactions between organisms and their biotic or physiochemical environment.

Contacts

Organization(s)
Biological Sciences (BIO)

Deadline(s)
Annual January Deadline: January 12, 2005
Annual July Deadline: July 12, 2005

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



F

FLUID DYNAMICS

Description

The Fluid Dynamics program supports fundamental engineering research and education on mechanisms and phenomena governing fluid flow from the molecular to the macroscopic scale.  Proposed research should contribute to basic understanding of fluid flow phenomena, thus enabling the better design, predictability, efficiency, and control of systems that involve fluids.  Areas of emphasis are proposals that address the behavior of new fluid materials and innovative uses of fluids in manufacturing, energy and the environment, materials development, biotechnology, nanotechnology, sensor development, clinical diagnostics and drug delivery. While the research should focus on fundamentals, a clear connection to potential applications with significant societal/technological impact should be outlined.

Major areas of interest and activity in the program include:

  • Bio-inspired Fluid Mechanics and Bio-flows: biomimetics; intracellular flows; fluid-structure interactions; hemodynamics; swimmers; insect flight; fins; biological flow processes; flows in biomedical devices; drug delivery.
  • Flow of Complex Fluids: non-Newtonian fluid mechanics; viscoelasticity; flow of polymer solutions and melts; gelation; flow-induced structuring; DNA dynamics; new fluid materials.
  • Micro- and Nano-fluidics: micro-and nano-scale flow phenomena; biomedical microdevices; effects of nano-inclusions on rheological properties; molecular dynamics simulations; optofluidics.
  • Turbulence and Transition: theory; high Reynolds number experiments; large eddy simulation; direct numerical simulation; transition to turbulence; 3-D boundary layers; multi-phase turbulent flows; flow control and drag reduction.
  • Interfacial Interactions and Instabilities: hydrodynamic stability; gas-liquid interfaces; splashing; jetting; droplet interactions; atomization; wetting. 
  • Instrumentation and Flow Diagnostics: Instrument development; MEMS; shear stress sensors; novel flow imaging; velocimetry.

Proposals on wind and ocean energy harvesting and on environmental flows could be submitted to the program when the proposed research is focused on fundamental fluid dynamics phenomena or on the development of novel computational fluid dynamics approaches, rather than applications or devices and materials.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered.  However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years.  The typical award size for the program is around $90,000 per year.  Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.  Small equipment proposals of less than $100,000 will also be considered and may be submitted during the annual proposal submission window.   

INFORMATION COMMON TO MOST CBET PROGRAMS

Proposals should address the novelty and/or potentially transformative nature of the proposed work compared to previous work in the field.  Also, it is important to address why the proposed work is important in terms of engineering science, as well as to also project the potential impact on society and/or industry of success in the research.  The novelty or potentially transformative nature of the research should be included, as a minimum, in the Project Summary of each proposal.

Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program proposals are strongly encouraged.  Award duration is five years.  The submission deadline for Engineering CAREER proposals is in July every year. Please see the CAREER URL here for more information. 

Proposals for Conferences, Workshops, and Supplements: PIs are strongly encouraged to discuss their requests with the Program Director before submission of the proposal.

Grants for Rapid Response Research (RAPID) and EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) are also considered when appropriate.  Please note that proposals of these types must be discussed with the program director before submission.  Further details are available in the Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) download found here.  Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) proposals that integrate fundamental research with translational results and are consistent with the application areas of interest to each program are also encouraged.  Please note that GOALI proposals must be submitted during the annual unsolicited proposal window for each program. More information on GOALI can be found here.

COMPLIANCE: Proposals which are not compliant with the Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) will be returned without review.

Unsolicited proposals received outside of the Announced Proposal Window dates will be returned without review.

Contacts
Dimitrios Papavassiliou   dpapavas@nsf.gov
Dimitrios Papavassiliou   dpapavas@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET)
Directorate for Engineering (ENG)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Window: October 1 through October 20, Effective 2015 to 2016

Full Proposal — Window: February 1 through March 1, Effective 2008 to 2008

Full Proposal — Window: August 15 through September 15, Effective 2008 to 2008

Full Proposal — Window: February 1 through March 1, Effective 2009 to 2009

Full Proposal — Window: October 1 through October 20, Effective 2015 to 2016

Full Proposal — Window: October 1, 2014 through November 5, 2014

Full Proposal — Window: October 1, 2016 through October 20, 2016

Full Proposal — Window: February 1, 2006 through March 1, 2006

Full Proposal — Window: August 15, 2005 through September 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Window: August 15, 2007 through September 15, 2007

Full Proposal — Window: February 1, 2007 through March 1, 2007

Full Proposal — Window: August 15, 2009 through September 17, 2009

Full Proposal — Window: February 1, 2010 through March 3, 2010

Full Proposal — Window: August 15, 2010 through September 23, 2010

Full Proposal — Window: February 1, 2011 through March 3, 2011

Full Proposal — Window: January 15, 2012 through February 17, 2012

Full Proposal — Window: January 15, 2013 through February 19, 2013

Full Proposal — Window: January 15, 2014 through February 20, 2014

Full Proposal — Window: October 1, 2016 through October 20, 2016

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

Description

The need for understanding the potential adverse impacts of a slowly acidifying sea upon marine ecosystems is widely recognized and included as a priority objective in the new National Ocean Policy. The effects of ocean acidification could significantly affect strategies for developing practices towards the sustainability of ocean resources.  Basic research concerning the nature, extent and impact of ocean acidification on oceanic environments in the past, present and future is required.  Research challenges include: 

  • Understanding the geochemistry and biogeochemistry of ocean acidification;
  • Understanding how ocean acidification interacts with biological, chemical and physical processes at the organismal level, and how such interactions impact the structure and function of ecosystems, e.g. through life histories, food webs, biogeochemical cycling, and interactions with other changes in the ocean (e.g., temperature, stratification, circulation patterns); and
  • Understanding how the earth system history informs our understanding of the effects of ocean acidification on the present day and future ocean.

Contacts
David Garrison   dgarriso@nsf.gov
Roberta Marinelli   rmarinel@nsf.gov
Candace Major   cmajor@nsf.gov
Henrietta Edmonds   hedmonds@nsf.gov
David Garrison   dgarriso@nsf.gov
Donald Rice   drice@nsf.gov
Henrietta Edmonds   hedmonds@nsf.gov
Irwin Forseth   iforseth@nsf.gov
Peter Milne   pmilne@nsf.gov
Candace Major   cmajor@nsf.gov
Lori Stevens   losteven@nsf.gov
Donald Rice   drice@nsf.gov
Gregory Warr   gwarr@nsf.gov
Charles Amsler   camsler@nsf.gov
William Zamer   wzamer@nsf.gov
Richard Zimmer   rzimmer@nsf.gov
Gregory Warr   gwarr@nsf.gov
Henrietta Edmonds   hedmonds@nsf.gov
Anna Manyak   amanyak@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Polar Programs (PLR)
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Division of Environmental Biology (DEB)
Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS)
Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB)
Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO)
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Division of Polar Programs (PLR)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Deadline Date: December 4, 2012

Letter of Intent — Deadline Date: March 29, 2010

Full Proposal — Deadline Date: April 26, 2010

Full Proposal — Deadline Date: January 6, 2012
Further Info: Regular Proposals, Research Coordination Networks (RCN), and EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals

Full Proposal — Deadline Date: December 3, 2013

Announcement(s)
Announcement: NSF 13-586

Additional Information



P

PALEOCLIMATE

Description

Supports research on the natural evolution of Earth's climate with the goal of providing a baseline for present variability and future trends through improved understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence climate over the long-term.

Competitive proposals will address specific aspects of scientific uncertainty for their proposed research.

All four Divisions in the Geosciences Directorate have joined in creating the annual Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change (P2C2) competition in paleoclimate global change research.  Researchers are encouraged to consider the P2C2 competition as a possible source of support for their global change research. 

Since proposals eligible for funding in the P2C2 competition are not eligible for funding in the Paleoclimate Program, researchers are strongly advised to contact the Director of the Paleoclimate Program for guidance as to the suitability of their proposed research for either program.


 

Contacts
David Verardo   dverardo@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Accepted Anytime

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Description

The Physical Oceanography Program supports research on a wide range of topics associated with the structure and movement of the ocean, with the way in which it transports various quantities, with the way the ocean's physical structure interacts with the biological and chemical processes within it, and with interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, solid earth and ice that surround it.

Contacts
Melissa Genazzio   mgenazzi@nsf.gov
Eric Itsweire   eitsweir@nsf.gov
Baris Uz   bmuz@nsf.gov
Alberto Mestas-Nunez   amestas@nsf.gov
Gloria Aguilar   gaguilar@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, Effective 2003 to 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, Effective 2005 to 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, Effective 2007 to 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, Effective 2007 to 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2004

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2005

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2006

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2009

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2010

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2013

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2016

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: February 15, 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2014

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2015

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2016

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2017

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2018

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2019

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2020

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2008

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2009

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2010

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2011

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2012

Full Proposal — Target Date: August 15, 2013

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



PHYSICAL AND DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY

Description

Physical and Dynamic Meteorology supports research involving studies of cloud physics; atmospheric electricity; radiation; boundary layer and turbulence; the initiation, growth, and propagation of gravity waves; all aspects of mesoscale meteorological phenomena, including their morphological, thermodynamic, and kinematic structure; development of mesoscale systems and precipitation processes; and transfer of energy between scales. The program also sponsors the development of new techniques and devices for atmospheric measurements.

Contacts
Chungu Lu   clu@nsf.gov
Ed Bensman   ebensman@nsf.gov
Nick Anderson   nanderso@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Accepted Anytime

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



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SOLAR TERRESTRIAL

Description

Supports research on the processes by which energy in diverse forms is generated by the Sun, transported to the Earth, and ultimately deposited in the terrestrial environment. Major topics include space weather impacts, helioseismology, the solar dynamo, the solar activity cycle, magnetic flux emergence, solar flares and eruptive activity, coronal mass ejections, solar wind heating, solar energetic particles, interactions with cosmic rays, and solar wind/magnetosphere boundary problems.

Contacts
Ilia Roussev   iroussev@nsf.gov

Organization(s)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)

Deadline(s)
Full Proposal — Accepted Anytime

Announcement(s)

Additional Information



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