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FUNDING > Cultivating Cultures...

Joseph A. Akkara (MPS)
jakkara@nsf.gov, (703) 292-4946

Cassandra M. Dudka (IIA)
cdudka@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7250

Ephraim P. Glinert (CISE)
eglinert@nsf.gov, (703) 292-8930

Jill L. Karsten (GEO)
jkarsten@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7718

Carter Kimsey (BIO)
ckimsey@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7170

Linda Layne (SBE)
llayne@nsf.gov, (703) 292-5026

Donna M. Riley (ENG)
driley@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7107

Joerg  . Schlatterer (EHR)
jschlatt@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7243

General inquiries regarding this program should be made to cce-stem-contacts@nsf.gov.

Solicitation 15-528

Important Notice to Proposers

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), NSF 13-1, was issued on October 4, 2012 and is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 14, 2013. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 13-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.

Please be aware that significant changes have been made to the PAPPG to implement revised merit review criteria based on the National Science Board (NSB) report, National Science Foundation's Merit Review Criteria: Review and Revisions. While the two merit review criteria remain unchanged (Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts), guidance has been provided to clarify and improve the function of the criteria. Changes will affect the project summary and project description sections of proposals. Annual and final reports also will be affected.

A by-chapter summary of this and other significant changes is provided at the beginning of both the Grant Proposal Guide and the Award & Administration Guide.

Full Proposal Deadline Date:  March 12, 2015

Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM) funds research projects that identify factors that are efficacious in the formation of ethical STEM researchers in all the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. CCE STEM solicits proposals for research that explores the following: ‘What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?'  Factors one might consider include:  honor codes,  professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements,  curricula or memberships in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility and  humanitarian goals,  institutions that  serve  under-represented groups,  institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels,  institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade.  Do certain labs have a ‘culture of academic integrity'? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, and integrated into other research and learning settings?

Successful proposals typically have a comparative dimension, either between or within institutional settings that differ along these or other factors.

CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.

Proposals for awards from minority-serving institutions (e.g. Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions), women's colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged.

What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

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