Skip to Content

FUNDING > Metals and Metallic...

Division of Materials Research

Gary Shiflet
gshiflet@nsf.gov, (703) 292-7576
Room 1065 N

Apply to PD 09-1771 as follows:

For full proposals submitted via FastLane: standard Grant Proposal Guidelines apply.
For full proposals submitted via Grants.gov: NSF Grants.gov Application Guide; A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov Guidelines apply (Note: The NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide)

Important Notice to Proposers

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), NSF 13-1, was issued on October 4, 2012 and is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 14, 2013. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 13-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.

Please be aware that significant changes have been made to the PAPPG to implement revised merit review criteria based on the National Science Board (NSB) report, National Science Foundation's Merit Review Criteria: Review and Revisions. While the two merit review criteria remain unchanged (Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts), guidance has been provided to clarify and improve the function of the criteria. Changes will affect the project summary and project description sections of proposals. Annual and final reports also will be affected.

A by-chapter summary of this and other significant changes is provided at the beginning of both the Grant Proposal Guide and the Award & Administration Guide.

The Metals and Metallic Nanostructures (MMN) Program supports fundamental research and education on the relationships between processing, structure and properties of metals and their alloys. The program focuses on experimental research while strongly encouraging the synergistic use of theory and computational materials science. Structure spanning atomic, nanometer, micrometer and larger length scales controls properties and connects these with processing.   The program emphasizes the role of structure across all these length scales, including structural imperfections such as vacancies, solutes, dislocations, boundaries and interfaces. Research should advance fundamental materials science that will enable the design and synthesis of metallic materials to optimize superior behaviors and enable the prediction of properties and performance. The program aims to advance the materials science of metals and alloys through transformative research on a diverse array of topics, including, but not limited to, phase transformations; equilibrium, non-equilibrium and far-from equilibrium structures; thermodynamics; kinetics; diffusion; interfaces; oxidation; performance in extreme environments; recyclability; magnetic behavior; thermal transport; plastic flow; and similar phenomena. Yield strength, flow stress, creep, fatigue and fracture are structural-materials examples. Magnetic energy density, shape-memory strain and thermoelectric efficiency are examples for functional materials.  Broader impacts are expected in education and other areas, such as workforce development, sustainability, environmental impact or critical infrastructure needs.  High-quality proposals that integrate research, education, and other broader impacts are invited.

Research in Undergraduate Institutions (NSF 00-144)
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF 07-569)
Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program (NSF 08-557)
Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) (NSF 12-513)

Time Window for submitting unsolicited proposals to DMR Programs

Disciplinary Research Activities

What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

News

Discoveries

Funding Home