text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation Home National Science Foundation - Geosciences (GEO)
Ocean Sciences (OCE)
design element
OCE Home
About OCE
Funding Opportunities
Awards
News
Events
Discoveries
Publications
Career Opportunities
NSF OCE Reply to NRC Sea Change Report, May 2015
Environmental Compliance
Making Waves, OCE Newsletter
See Additional OCE Resources
View OCE Staff
GEO Organizations
Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS)
Earth Sciences (EAR)
Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Polar Programs (PLR)
Proposals and Awards
Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  Introduction
Proposal Preparation and Submission
bullet Grant Proposal Guide
  bullet Grants.gov Application Guide
Award and Administration
bullet Award and Administration Guide
Award Conditions
Merit Review
NSF Outreach
Policy Office
Additional OCE Resources
Career Opportunities
Science Driven Assessment of Needs for Marine Sediment Coring, 2015-2025
Frequently Asked Questions by Ocean Sciences PIs for the CAREER Competition
Integrative Programs Section: Additional Information
OCE Data and Sample Policy
Policy on Seismic Reflection Equipment Per Foreign Waters
Seismic PEIS Scoping Posters
Other Site Features
Special Reports
Research Overviews
Multimedia Gallery
Classroom Resources
NSF-Wide Investments

Email this pagePrint this page
GeoPRISMS Program - News


Showing: 1-4 of 4 | Search News

a photo of the edge of the Greenland ice sheet Scientists track Greenland's ice melt with seismic waves
Released May 6, 2016
News From the Field
sonar image of bubbles rising from the seafloor Bubble plumes off Washington, Oregon suggest warmer ocean may be releasing frozen methane
Released October 14, 2015
News From the Field
sonar image of bubbles rising from a seafloor Warmer Pacific Ocean could release millions of tons of seafloor methane
Released December 9, 2014
News From the Field
image of the Grand Canyon Molten magma can survive in upper crust for hundreds of millennia
Released August 19, 2013
News From the Field
Showing: 1-4 of 4


Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page