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Tissue engineering at South Carolina EPSCoR


Student works on a project to grow cells that will later combine with a degradable plastic material

Kelly Renshaw, an M.S. student working in the lab of Karen Burg, a professor at Clemson University, works on a project to grow cells that will later combine with a degradable plastic material. The material on and in which the cells are grown is designed to house and deliver cells to a damaged site and subsequently to degrade while the delivered cells grow to form replacement tissue. The focus of this particular study is to create lost tissue for women who have experienced breast cancer.

Burg's research is under the National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) South Carolina Cooperative Agreement with Clemson. The university has established a strong collaborative research effort in materials-based biotechnology. One of the goals of the program is to design new material surfaces and bioactive synthetic protein mimetic molecules with applications to include the development of novel materials for tissue engineering, implant devices, and drug and drug delivery systems design. (Date of Image: Unknown)

Credit: South Carolina EPSCoR Program; Clemson University

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