text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
Search Multimedia
Image
Video
Audio
More
Multimedia in the News
NSF Executive Staff
News Archive
 

Email this pagePrint this page
Imagine That! - TV That's Good for You


Imagine That!
Audio Play Audio

Imagine That! - TV That's Good for You

Credit: NSF/Finger Lakes Productions International

Audio Transcript:

"Zoom" was one of the first shows hosted entirely by kids -- and the first to create a genuine relationship with kids watching at home. "Zoom" has actually had two lives, the first during the nineteen seventies. The current "Zoom" came back in the late nineties with a renewed focus on science and engineering. Marisa Wolsky, science producer for "Zoom," says the key to engaging kids is&well&kids.

Wolsky: "We have really been able to take what are kid-generated ideas and translate them into very substantive science and math segments. So what's exciting about "Zoom" is that there's seven real kids doing science experiments on the TV show that then inspire viewers at home to do the same."

Maybe you're a science major because of the program. Whatever your major, you've graduated from shows like "Zoom." But there are hundreds of other series on public TV to choose from that are still good for your mind. It goes back to the advice I bet your parents gave you when you first went to college -- make the right choices! I'm Eric Phillips.

"Imagine That!" covers projects funded by the U.S. government's National Science Foundation. Federally sponsored research -- brought to you by you! Learn more at nsf.gov.

 
General Restrictions:
Images and other media in the National Science Foundation Multimedia Gallery are available for use in print and electronic material by NSF employees, members of the media, university staff, teachers and the general public. All media in the gallery are intended for personal, educational and nonprofit/non-commercial use only.

Images credited to the National Science Foundation, a federal agency, are in the public domain. The images were created by employees of the United States Government as part of their official duties or prepared by contractors as "works for hire" for NSF. You may freely use NSF-credited images and, at your discretion, credit NSF with a "Courtesy: National Science Foundation" notation. Additional information about general usage can be found in Conditions.

RealPlayer icon
This Audio requires the free RealPlayer plug-in.

 



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page