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RAFLES Model Results


This figure presents a virtual reality visualization of the RAFLES model results

This figure presents a virtual reality visualization of the RAFLES model results. RAFLES--an atmospheric, high-resolution large eddy simulation--was developed in part for National Science Foundation (NSF) grant DEB 04-53665. The visualization is performed using the Duke University Immersed Virtual Environment (DiVE) simulator (developed under NSF grant BCS 04-20632) that projects 3-D holographic images in a specialized viewing room.

The canopy is based on data from remote sensing of the Duke Forest in North Carolina. Canopy data--used for generation of the random virtual canopy in images--was obtained from Michael Wolosin and Jim Clark in the biology department at Duke, and gathered using remote sensing in an NSF-funded project under grant IIS 04-30693. The canopy top is presented as a green sheet and stems are brown lines. A vertical cross section of the domain is color coded for the vertical component of the wind where yellow and red are strong positive winds--for example, ejection events--and blue and white are negative winds, or sweep events. The full wind vectors are shown using arrows. Ejection events are organized, fast vortexes and can carry heavy seeds to high altitudes and consequently, facilitate long-distance dispersal. The canopy data that was used for the generation of the random virtual canopy images was obtained using remote sensing (Date of Image: 2006)

Credit: Gil Bohrer, Robert L. Walko, Rachael Brady and Roni Avissar; Duke University 2006
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