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Quantum Dot Wave Function (Image 2)


Part of a series of images depicting electron densities in a quantum dot artificial atom

Quantum Dot Wave Function (Image 2)

Quantum dots are like man-made artificial atoms that are described by discrete states. The images in this series represent the electron densities in a quantum dot artificial atom.

The visuals were generated by the Nanoelectronic Modeling tool called "NENO 3-D," and were visualized on the nanoVIS rendering service at www.nanoHUB.org, a rich, Web-based resource for research, education and collaboration in nanotechnology.

NanoHUB.org was created by the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN), a network of universities with a vision to pioneer the development of nanotechnology, from science to manufacturing, through innovative theory, exploratory simulation and novel cyberinfrastructure. NCN students, staff and faculty are developing the NanoHUB science gateway, while making use of it in their own research and education. Collaborators and partners across the world have joined NCN in this effort.

NanoHUB hosts over 790 resources to help users learn about nanotechnology, including online presentations, courses, learning modules, podcasts, animations, teaching materials and more. Most importantly, NanoHUB offers simulation tools that can be accessed from your Web browser, so you can not only learn about, but also simulate nanotechnology devices. NanoHUB also provides collaboration environment via Workspaces, online meetings and user groups.

Resources for NanoHUB come from 489 contributors in the nanoscience community and are used by thousands of people from more than 180 countries around the world. Most of the users come from academic institutions and use NanoHUB as part of their research and educational activities, but some users come from national labs and from industry. (Date of Image: May 2006) [Image 2 of 3 related images. See Image 3.]

Credit: Wei Qiao, David Ebert, Marek Korkusinski, Gerhard Klimeck, Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue University

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Images credited to the National Science Foundation, a federal agency, are in the public domain. The images were created by employees of the United States Government as part of their official duties or prepared by contractors as "works for hire" for NSF. You may freely use NSF-credited images and, at your discretion, credit NSF with a "Courtesy: National Science Foundation" notation. Additional information about general usage can be found in Conditions.

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