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New Plant Species Tragopogon miscellus


Recently identified plant species <em>Tragopogon miscellus</em>

The recently identified plant species Tragopogon miscellus appeared in the United States 80 years ago. It came about when two species in the daisy family--introduced from Europe--mated to produce a hybrid offspring. Researchers say that studying the plant is providing insight into how evolution works and could help improve crop plants.

This research, which was funded by the National Science Foundation (grants DEB 06-14421, MCB 03-46437, DEB 09-19254 and DEB 09-19348), was carried out at the University of Florida and Iowa State University and involved scientists from Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL), Massey University in New Zealand, and Shanxi Normal University in China.

To learn more, see the QMUL news release New plant species gives insights into evolution. (Date of Image: 2007)

Credit: Evgeny Mavrodiev, Florida Museum of Natural History

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