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An illustration of multilayer graphene supported on an amorphous SiO2 substrate.

An illustration of multilayer graphene supported on an amorphous SiO2 substrate.


Pictured is an illustration of multilayer graphene supported on an amorphous SiO2 substrate. Sadeghi et al found that the basal-plane thermal conductivity of the supported multilayer graphene increases with increasing layer thickness and has yet to recover to the graphite value even when the thickness is increased to 34 layers.

The effect is more pronounced at lower temperatures. They attributed the finding to partially diffuse scattering of phonons at the graphene-support interface, especially diffuse transmission of phonons across the interface, as well as long phonon mean free path in graphite even along the cross-plane direction.

Credit: Image courtesy of Jo Wozniak, Texas Advanced Computing Center

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