text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 04-053
Yet Another Benefit of Green Tea

New, biodegradable machining compound is more effective than industry standards

Back to article | Note about images

Dr. John Lombardi holding a separator funnel

Dr. John Lombardi of Ventana Research holding a separator funnel containing the company’s environmentally friendly fluid used in ceramic polishing.

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (232 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

A separator funnel

A separator funnel containing Ventana's machining fluid.

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (170 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

machine used by Ventana Research for evaluating fluids

The machine used by Ventana Research for evaluating fluids during the Phase I SBIR program. The researchers mount computer hard drive read-write heads in the brass T-shaped attachment on the right side of the machine. Weights apply pressure to the "T" and to the read-write head specimen. The researchers measure the sample weight change before and after.

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (387 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

A close-up of the machine in action

A close-up of the machine in action. The dark brown rings on the rotating abrasive wheel are from the "lapping swarf." The swarf is a mixture of the Ventana fluid and ceramic debris particles from the read-write head specimen. During the process, the researchers add the Ventana fluid drop by drop onto the rotating wheel. Centripetal acceleration causes the swarf to move to the outer edge of the rotating wheel.

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (542 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

A side view of six polished ceramic read-write heads

A side view of six polished ceramic read-write heads assembled in a holding tray. Note the metallization on the edges of the bars. The ceramic material itself is black.

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (193 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

The investigators responsible for the environmentally friendly fluid

The investigators responsible for the environmentally friendly fluid who were supported by an NSF Phase I SBIR grant. From left: Dr. Donald Zipperian (Pace Technologies, Tucson, Ariz.), Dr. John Lombardi (Principal Investigator, Ventana Research Company, Tucson, Ariz.) and Prof. Srini Raghavan (University of Arizona, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Tucson, Ariz.).

Credit: Erica von Koerber, Evon Photography (Tucson, Ariz.)


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (407 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Lapping machine

View Video
In this movie, the ceramic read-write heads are loaded into a holding tray and mounted on the polishing machine. The heads are then lowered for the polishing process, during which the Ventana fluid is added drop by drop onto the rotating wheel. Centripetal acceleration causes the fluid and debris to move to the outer edge of the rotating wheel.

Credit: Ventana Research

 

Lapping machine screen shot from video

View Video
Download video (filesize: 4.3MB). In this movie, the ceramic read-write heads are loaded into a holding tray and mounted on the polishing machine. The heads are then lowered for the polishing process, during which the Ventana fluid is added drop by drop onto the rotating wheel. Centripetal acceleration causes the fluid and debris to move to the outer edge of the rotating wheel.

Credit: Ventana Research

 



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page