Skip to main content
Email Print Share

All Images


Press Release 04-060

University of Colorado Tissue Engineer to Receive NSF's Coveted Waterman Award

Kristi Anseth builds onto her fast track career with $500,000 award

Back to article | Note about images

a cluster of cells found in the developing central nervous system

A cluster of cells found in the developing central nervous system are shown growing in a scaffold environment. Tissue engineers at the University of Colorado at Boulder work to control how these cells grow and communicate. Researchers hope to develop degradable biomaterials that can be used to deliver cells and control their integration with the nervous system. These approaches may be used someday in procedures to heal injuries or treat diseases, such as Parkison's disease.

Credit: Melissa Mahoney, Anseth Lab


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (144 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Picture depict how cells within the heart valve can be regulated

Pictures depict how cells within the heart valve can be regulated through a delivery of biologically active molecules. The scaffold can be used to present these molecules to the cells and influence how the cells express different proteins, which is very important in the regeneration of healthy tissue structures. Engineers carefully manage this process to prevent the over-production of proteins, which could lead to an unhealthy imbalance and tissues that won't function properly.

Credit: Gennye Walker of the Leslie Leinwand Lab, collaborator with the Anseth Lab at the University of Colorado at Boulder


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (76 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Pictures depict how cells within the heart valve can be regulated

Pictures depict how cells within the heart valve can be regulated through a delivery of biologically active molecules. The scaffold can be used to present these molecules to the cells and influence how the cells express different proteins, which is very important in the regeneration of healthy tissue structures. Engineers carefully manage this process to prevent the over-production of proteins, which could lead to an unhealthy imbalance and tissues that won't function properly.

Credit: Gennye Walker of the Leslie Leinwand Lab, collaborator with the Anseth Lab at the University of Colorado at Boulder


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (26 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.