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Press Release 04-122
NSF Announces Six 'FIBR' Awards to Tackle Some of Biology's Most Challenging Questions

Multidisciplinary teams to study animal movement, genetic links to outside world

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Tagged bees communicating on hive honeycomb.

Tagged bees communicating on hive honeycomb. Through a functional analysis of social behavior in honey bees across the entire genome, the BeeSpace project will tackle one of the most hotly debated questions in biology: Are genes or environment the primary reason for a person's or other animal's behavior?

Credit: Copyright Ken Lorenzen, University of California, Davis


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Arabidopsis thaliana

To bloom or not to bloom? A project led by Johanna Schmitt of Brown University will examine genetic variation in flowering responses in Arabidopsis thaliana (shown here) to better understand how plants "listen" to environmental signals and how their responses evolve in different climates.

Credit: J. Schmitt, Brown University


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Live and robot cockroaches traversing rough terrain

A team led by Robert Full of the University of California, Berkeley will work with cockroaches - both living and robotic - to uncover the neural and muscular pathways that lead to the remarkably similar patterns of whole-body motion in animals as diverse as crabs, cockroaches, lizards, dogs and humans.

Credit: (Left) Robert Full, UC Berkeley. (Right) Daniel Koditschek, University of Pennsylvania


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cyanobacteruim Synechocystis 6803

To study how plants balance between essential and destructive oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions, a project led by Himadri Pakrasi of Washington University, St. Louis, will study photosynthesis in the cyanobacteruim Synechocystis 6803 (shown here), plants and mosses.

Credit: ??


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