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All Images


Press Release 05-005
New Image Sensor will Show what the Eyes See, and a Camera Cannot

Software behind the technology already finding its way into photo editing

Back to article | Note about images

Vladimir Brajovic holding an image sensor similar to proposed chip

Vladimir Brajovic and his collaborators at Intrigue Technologies are developing an image sensor that will approach the adaptive capabilities of the human eye. The chip in this photo is a product of the team's related research at Carnegie Mellon. Like the proposed chip, it is a computational image sensor that pre-processes an image before sending it to a computer, video screen or other outlet.

Credit: Vladimir Brajovic, Carnegie Mellon University and Intrigue Technologies


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (779 KB)

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underexposed image of desert road

Road departure warning systems are hampered by conventional cameras. Shadow Illuminator will help the image analysis components of these systems by extracting details from shadows. This is the original, underexposed image of a desert road.

Credit: Timothy E. Nelson


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (146 KB)

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image of desert road processed by Shadow lluminator

After the new software processed the image, details in the road and surrounding rock became visible.

Credit: Timothy E. Nelson


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (287 KB)

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image of chest x-ray

When applied to x-ray images, Shadow Illuminator enhances contrast and reveals new detail. This is the unprocessed image of a chest x-ray film.

Credit: Nikola Zivaljevic, M.D.


Download the high-resolution TIF version of the image. (204 KB)

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image of chest xray

The software reveals additional detail in the x-ray.

Credit: Nikola Zivaljevic, M.D.


Download the high-resolution TIF version of the image. (207 KB)

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underexposed image of airport interior

The new software may help airport security systems "see" objects in shadows. Here, a combination of dim artificial lights and natural light pouring in from windows, creates numerous obstacles for image sensors.

Credit: Vladimir Brajovic


Download the high-resolution TIF version of the image. (6.4 MB)

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image of airport interior

After Shadow Illuminator processing, an area once dominated by shadow now reveals the image of a man in the bottom left corner of the scene.

Credit: Vladimir Brajovic, Carnegie Mellon University and Intrigue Technology


Download the high-resolution TIF version of the image. (6.1 MB)

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