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Press Release 05-021

Bipedal Bots Star at AAAS Media Briefing

Novel, energy frugal robots walk like we do

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Video News Release showcasing the bipedal walking robots

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Researchers at Cornell, MIT and the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands have developed a new breed of powered, energy efficient, two-legged robots with a surprisingly human gait. By applying concepts rooted in "passive-dynamic walkers"—devices that can walk down a gentle slope powered only by the pull of gravity—the engineers have crafted robots that can walk on level ground, in some cases using as little as one-half the wattage of a standard compact fluorescent light bulb.

Credit: NSF

 

The Cornell passive-dynamic, powered robot.

The Cornell passive-dynamic, powered robot.

Credit: Cornell University


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A gravity driven passive-dynamic robot from Cornell.

A gravity driven, passive-dynamic robot from Cornell, a precursor to the powered passive-dynamic robots.

Credit: Cornell University


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The MIT passive-dynamics powered robot.

The MIT passive-dynamic powered robot.

Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


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Denise, the Delft University of Technology passive-dynamics robot.

Denise, the Delft University of Technology passive-dynamic robot.

Credit: Delft University of Technology


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Close-up view of the robot Denise's foot.

Close-up view of the robot Denise's foot.

Credit: Delft University of Technology


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