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Press Release 05-057
A Planetary Family Feud

Simulations suggest that the system still bears scars

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Upsilon Andromedae system

An artist's rendition of the Upsilon Andromedae planetary system.

Credit: Sylwia Walerys, Northwestern University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (578 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Upsilon Andromedae system

An artist's rendition of the Upsilon Andromedae system.

Credit: Sylwia Walerys, Northwestern University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (600 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Upsilon Andromedae animation (small)

View Video

Turn video captions on or off.

This animation shows the "family feud" that researchers now believe left the Upsilon Andromedae planetary system in its current, somewhat disturbed state. In the beginning, we see three huge Jupiter-like planets orbiting the star in roughly circular orbits. (Not shown here is a fourth planet that orbits very, very close to the star.) But for some reason--because of friction with interplanetary dust, for example - the outer planet has wandered in too close to its sibling in the middle. The result is a kind of rhythmic shoving match, as the two planets' mutual gravitational attraction starts to knock their orbits askew with each close encounter. Matters escalate - and in fairly short order, the offending planet is ejected from the planetary system completely. The middle planet now takes its place the outer planet, and settles into an extended, elliptical orbit much different from the one it started with. In the millennia to come, its gravitational influence will pull the third planet into an elliptical orbit, as well.


Turning captions on or off:
To see the clip with the captions on, you will need to select Tools > Preferences > Content > Use Supplemental text captioning when available, or deselect it if you do not wish to see the captions. Then re-start the video.

Credit: Trent Schindler/National Science Foundation

 

Upsilon Andromedae animation: Broadcast Quality Version

View Video
This animation shows the "family feud" that researchers now believe left the Upsilon Andromedae planetary system in its current, somewhat disturbed state. In the beginning, we see three huge Jupiter-like planets orbiting the star in roughly circular orbits. (Not shown here is a fourth planet that orbits very, very close to the star.) But for some reason--because of friction with interplanetary dust, for example - the outer planet has wandered in too close to its sibling in the middle. The result is a kind of rhythmic shoving match, as the two planets' mutual gravitational attraction starts to knock their orbits askew with each close encounter. Matters escalate - and in fairly short order, the offending planet is ejected from the planetary system completely. The middle planet now takes its place the outer planet, and settles into an extended, elliptical orbit much different from the one it started with. In the millennia to come, its gravitational influence will pull the third planet into an elliptical orbit, as well.

Credit: Trent Schindler/National Science Foundation

 



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