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Press Release 05-126
Amazon River Cycles Carbon Faster than Thought

Carbon is Returned to Atmosphere in Five Short Years

Back to article | Note about images

Researchers doing field work in the Amazon River Basin often travel one-lane dirt roads.

Researchers doing field work in the Amazon River Basin often travel one-lane dirt roads that requires fording streams and maneuvering along the tops of 1,000 foot precipices.

Credit: University of Washington


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Map of Amazon river sampling site.

Map of Amazon river sampling site.

Credit: University of Washington


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Anthony Aufdenkampe taking water samples from the Pixiam River in Brazil.

Anthony Aufdenkampe taking water samples from the Pixiam River in Brazil.

Credit: Stroud Water Research Center


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Accurate sampling requires water from the middle of rivers.

Accurate sampling requires water from the middle of rivers, in this case researchers take advantage of a stone bridge built by the Spaniards during the colonial period before the 19th century to collect samples from a high Andes river in Peru.

Credit: Stroud Water Research Center


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