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Press Release 06-021
High-Tech Sieve Sifts for Hydrogen

New polymer use may yield cheaper way to separate hydrogen from impurities

Back to article | Note about images

Screen shot from animation showing diffusion

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This animation depicts the diffusion of unwanted carbon dioxide through the new polymer membrane. Most hydrogen stays on the upstream side of the membrane while the carbon dioxide passes through at a steady rate.

Credit: Trent Schindler, National Science Foundation

 

Benny Freeman of The University of Texas at Austin holds a sample of the new membrane.

Benny Freeman of The University of Texas at Austin holds a sample of the transparent membrane material developed in his laboratory.

Credit: Jennie Trower, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Benny Freeman stands next to the gas permeation system his team used in their research.

Benny Freeman of The University of Texas at Austin stands next to the gas permeation system he and his collaborators used to develop the new mebrane.

Credit: Jennie Trower, The University of Texas at Austin

 



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