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Press Release 06-022
Request for National Science Foundation Fiscal Year 2007 Is $6.02 Billion

Sum reflects agency's key role in American Competitiveness Initiative

Back to article | Note about images

The fiscal year 2007 budget to Congress requests $6.02 billion for NSF.

NSF's FY 2007 budget to Congress requests $6.02 billion as part of a 10-year doubling initiative. Cover image: Exponential by Eric Heller. In additional to his work as professor of physics and chemistry at Harvard University and National Science Foundation grantee, Dr. Heller creates digital abstract art inspired by the quantum realm of electrons, atoms and molecules. Exponential is based on electron flow paths in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG).

Credit: Eric Heller, Harvard University


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Scientists have developed a new nanotech method to carve tiny holes into sheets of gold.

By applying electric current through a thin film of oil molecules, mechanical engineer Ajay Malshe of the University of Arkansas and his students have developed a new method to precisely carve arrays of tiny holes only 10 nanometers wide into sheets of gold. The process may yield miniscule molecular detection devices, semiconducting connectors, molecular sieves for protein sorting and nanojets for fuel or drug delivery. The research is part of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, led by NSF.

Credit: Ajay Malshe and Kumar Virwani, University of Arkansas / K.P. Rajurkar, University of Nebraska


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CRONUS uses cosmic rays from the distant heavens to reconstruct the history of the Earth.

The CRONUS project uses cosmic rays from the distant heavens to reconstruct the history of geologic events here on Earth. The cosmic rays come from galactic explosions known as supernovas, which send billions of the fantastically energetic atomic particles slamming into the Earths surface every year. These impacts, in turn, blast apart atoms in the rocks to create new elements, which accumulate over time. By measuring those atoms, scientists can gauge how much time has passed since the rock was disturbed by geological events such as earthquakes, landslides, and glaciers. The new cosmic-ray methods will shed light on Earth's past climate cycles, changes in soil erosion, frequency of floods and landslides, and how weathering of rocks affects global warming and cooling.

Credit: CRONUS

 

Photo of the Panamanian golden frog.

The Panamanian golden frog is one of more than 100 species of disappearing harlequin frogs. Scientists estimate that about 67 percent of harlequin frogs have disappeared due to fungus outbreaks driven by global warming.

Credit: Forrest Brem, courtesy of NatureServe

 

NSF CI-TEAM awards support global research and education activities in cyberinfrastructure.

NSF's CI-TEAM awards support projects engaged in global research and education activities in cyberinfrastructure.

Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller, National Science Foundation

 



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