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Press Release 06-065
New Fossils Link "Ape-men" to More Primitive Ancestors

Scientists say discovery "closes the gap"

Back to article | Note about images

Tim White (left) gently lifts a piece of the shattered tooth.

At the site where fossil hunter Kampiro Kareinto (right) found the first canine tooth of an Australopithecus anamensis, Tim White gently lifts a piece of the shattered tooth.

Credit: Photo 2005 David L. Brill\Brill Atlanta

 

Teeth at Middle Awash, Ethiopia, come from Australopithecus anamensis.

The fossils found at Middle Awash, Ethiopia, date between 4.1 million-4.2 million years old and come from Australopithecus anamensis. Shown here are the teeth from the upper jaw, from left: third molar, second molar, first molar, fourth premolar, third premolar and canine.

Credit: Photo 2005 Tim D. White\Brill Atlanta

 

Teeth and bones from Australopithecus anamensis are 4.1 million-4.2 million years old.

The fossils found at Middle Awash, Ethiopia date between 4.1 million-4.2 million years old and come from Australopithecus anamensis. The sample includes teeth, upper jaws, hand and foot bones, vertebral fragments, a thigh bone, and fragments of a skull and mandible.

Credit: Photo 2006 David L. Brill\Brill Atlanta

 



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