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Press Release 07-006
Blood-Cell-Sized Memory Device Beats Industry Estimates for Computing Capacity

Nanochip moves molecular computers a step closer

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An area no bigger than a white blood cell (greenish circles) contains the 160,000 bit memory array.

The bluish-grey area in the center of the picture contains the 160,000 bit memory array. The greenish circles nearby are white blood cells.

Credit: Jonathan Green, John Nagarah and Habib Ahmad, California Institute of Technology


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Molecular switches are made of a molecular ring encircling a dumbbell-shaped molecule.

Molecular switches (right) called [2]rotaxanes are made of two interlocking components--a molecular ring encircling a dumbbell-shaped molecule. When the switch is triggered, the ring slides between two locations on the dumbbell to control conductivity. Designed in the UCLA laboratory of J. Fraser Stoddart, the switches store information in an ultra-dense 160-kilobit memory made up of a 400 x 400 grid of nanowires (left).

Credit: J. Fraser Stoddart Supramolecular Chemistry Group, UCLA


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