text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 08-107
What It's Like to Be a Bat

Bats' vocal sonar does more than locate objects; it cues memory and assists flight

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of bats emerging from their roost.

New research explores data that shows the high-pitched chirps bats make produce changes in brain activity that may be important for helping them "picture" and analyze their environment, turn their head and ears, and cue memory. The research, which looks beyond the last 40 years of research into how bats process sound, may eventually benefit people who are blind.

Credit: National Park Service


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (59 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Cynthia Moss, a member of the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science program at the University of Maryland, College Park, Md., talks about how bats emit sounds and use echolocation to picture environments, cue memory and assist flight.

Credit: University of Maryland and National Science Foundation

 

Photo of a bat pursuing a moth.

When a bat pursues prey such as a moth, it computes the 3D location of objects in its environment from information carried by the echoes of its voice.

Credit: Photo by Jessica Nelson


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (512 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page