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Press Release 08-172
Gas From the Past Gives Scientists New Insights into Climate and the Oceans

Ice core and ocean deposit comparisons show complex links between carbon dioxide levels, ocean currents and climate; may help explain past, present and future climate trends

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Photo of bubbles containing ancient gases in a piece of an Antarctic ice core sample.

The bubbles visible in this piece from an Antarctic ice core sample contain carbon dioxide and other gases that were trapped in the ice when formed thousands of years ago. Researchers carefully crush the piece and capture the gases that escape when the bubbles break. This allows them to better understand what carbon dioxide levels were over time.

Credit: Courtesy of Oregon State University


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Cover of October 3, 2008, issue of Science magazine.

The researchers' findings are published in the October 3, 2008, issue of Science magazine.

Credit: Copyright 2008 AAAS


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