text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 09-054
Maybe Robots Dream of Electric Sheep, But Can They Do Science?

Researchers use algorithm developed for self-repairing robots to uncover scientific laws hidden in raw data

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of Cornell University researchers holding up a double pendulum.

Cornell University researcher Hod Lipson (at right) and his doctoral student Michael Schmidt hold up a double pendulum, a simple device that follows deceptively complicated natural laws when it swings. Lipson and Schmidt used the device, and others, in their experiments to prove that an algorithm developed for self-repairing robots can uncover scientific laws hidden in raw data. The breakthrough may aid the discovery of new scientific truths, particularly for biological systems, that have until now eluded detection.

Credit: Jonathan Hiller, Cornell University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (922 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Audio only

Play Audio
Cornell researcher Hod Lipson and his doctoral student Michael Schmidt discuss their findings with reporters during a telecon on April 1, 2009.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Photo of the double pendulum used by Cornell researchers Hod Lipson and Michael Schmidt.

The double pendulum used by Cornell researchers Hod Lipson and Michael Schmidt to test their algorithm for automatically determining natural laws from raw experimental data.

Credit: Cornell University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (509 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of the airtrack used by Cornell researchers Hod Lipson and Michael Schmidt.

The airtrack used by Cornell researchers Hod Lipson and Michael Schmidt to test their algorithm for automatically determining natural laws from raw experimental data.

Credit: Cornell University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (436 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of Cornell University doctoral student Michael Schmidt setting up testing equipment.

Cornell University doctoral student Michael Schmidt sets up testing equipment in the motion tracking laboratory of his adviser Hod Lipson. Lipson and Schmidt used the equipment to evaluate their new algorithm for finding fundamental laws by analyzing raw data.

Credit: Daniel Cohen, Cornell University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.8 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Cover of April 3, 2009 issue of Science magazine.

The researchers' findings were published in the April 3, 2009, issue of Science magazine.

Credit: Copyright 2009 AAAS


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.2 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page