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All Images


Press Release 10-034
Forest Tree Species Diversity Depends on Individual Variation

Thinking flawed that all species react the same to the environment

Back to article | Note about images

Image showing elevation contours outlining tree heights.

Elevation contours outline tree heights, allowing for research on effects of light on the forest.

Credit: James Clark


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Photo of a forest.

Low-altitude remote sensing is used to determine light captured by neighboring trees.

Credit: James Clark


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Photo of trees.

The environment--and the individual trees within it--look alike but vary in thousands of ways.

Credit: James Clark


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Image of a grid in which individual trees may be seen.

An alternate look at a forest: through a grid in which individual trees may be seen.

Credit: Jim Clark


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Researchers measure the diameter of trees to track responses to environmental change.

Researchers measure the diameter of trees to track responses to environmental change.

Credit: James Clark


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Cover of the February 26, 2010 issue of the journal Science.

The researcher's finding appears in the February 26, 2010 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2010


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